Wednesday, October 7, 2009

What's Forgivable? (Sex Offenders)

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IL - Violence, “Won’t Be Solved by Government” (Neither will sexual abuse!)

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


GA - Walker Co. Mother Discovers Sex Offender Next Door

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Maybe this lady should have been a parent and checked the online registry before moving in? If I were the owner of the place she signed a lease for, I would not let her out of it, it's her fault, not someone else's fault, for not checking. Why should others protect you? That is your responsibility!

10/06/2009

WALKER COUNTY (WRCB) - When Nikki Crowder moved into her Chickamauga apartment last February, she had no idea she'd be sharing a roof with a registered sex offender.
- Aww, you should have checked beforehand!

"That's what really blows my mind," said Crowder, holding her 16-month-old son. "Our landlord didn't tell us knowing we had him."
- So when was it the landlords responsibility to tell you this?  It's your responsibility to protect yourself, not theirs or the governments.

Crowder says her landlord should have warned her. Now Crowder has moved in with her mother and wants out of her one-year lease.
- No, you should have checked before moving into the place.  And the landlord should not let you out of the lease for something that was YOUR fault!

"The landlord said we would have to pay the whole year even if we moved out, and we can't afford to just go find a new place all the sudden," she said.
- Aww, too bad!

We contacted Crowder's landlord who tells a different story. She says Crowder and her boyfriend can get out any time without penalty. She also said the man living next door, although a registered sex offender, is the ideal tenant.

The man convicted of the crime did not want to go on camera but admitted off-camera to his crime saying he's served his time and is now in counseling.

Walker County Sheriff Steve Wilson confirmed the registered offender is in compliance with state guidelines. Wilson says while he understands Crowder's concern, it's not up to a registered sex offender or a landlord to notify other tenants.
- Exactly, it's her responsibility, but she appears to be the type of person who wants to blame her problems on others, instead of on herself!

"The burden is on them," said Wilson. "Georgia law puts the burden back on the residents."

Wilson says the county's sex offender registry can help.

Using the database, we found Crowder's neighbor is one of nine registered sex offenders living within a two-mile radius of her home.
- Yeah, check where she now lives with her mother, I'm sure there is a couple sex offenders around there as well!

It's information Nikki Crowder plans to use when looking for her next address.

"That's definitely something we look into now," said Crowder. "It really is."

Georgia state law prohibits registered sex offenders from living within 1,000 feet of schools, churches or day cares. It does not prohibit offenders from living in neighborhoods where children live.

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


Sex Offender Halloween Hysteria & Fear Mongering

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


NC - North Carolina Sex Offender Goes To Court For Right To Worship

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More detailed story here

10/07/2009

By Matt McKinney

Raleigh - A North Carolina man is challenging a state law aimed at keeping people like him away from children. The case pits the right to worship against laws that restrict where convicted sex offenders can go.

Police arrested _____ in March after he attended a Sunday service at a church that offers day care.

Many of the three dozen states that establish zones where sex offenders can't live or visit don't provide exemptions for churches.

Advocates agree some convicted sex offenders should never be allowed around children. But they say barring all offenders denies them support needed to become productive citizens.

A similar lawsuit is pending in federal court in Georgia.


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


Matt Ridley on Evolution, Economics, and "Ideas Having Sex"

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


CT - No Sex Offenders Allowed

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10/08/2009

By Daniel D’Ambrosio

Greenwich ponders restricting where registered sex offenders can go

Greenwich has just five sex offenders listed on the state’s official registry. Compare that to 542 for Hartford, with a total population only about double the posh Gold Coast enclave. There are a total of 4,975 registered offenders in the state.

Yet it is town officials in Greenwich who have been debating since February whether to approve an ordinance that would prohibit sex offenders from being near schools, parks, playgrounds and other places children congregate. The ordinance would not limit where sex offenders can live, as similar laws in other states do, but it would impose a $100 fine on a registered offender caught in the wrong place for a second time.

After unanimous approval by the Board of Selectmen, the measure moved on to the Representative Town Meeting, the city’s 230-member legislative body, where it failed twice, most recently on Sept. 21.

Robert Brady, chairman of the RTM’s education committee, said last week the three committees, including his, which rejected the measure, were concerned about its fairness and effectiveness.

Police say it’s useless and doesn’t help them. Why on earth would the town go forward on something that’s of no use and simply a waste of money?” said Brady.

The ordinance’s chief proponent, Sam Romeo, chairman of the Community and Police Partnership Committee for the eastern end of town, bristled at Brady’s contention that Greenwich Police didn’t back the ordinance, and police spokesman Lt. Daniel Allen confirmed the department approached the town about the ordinance.

Romeo called the measure a “no-brainer,” especially given the proximity of metropolitan New York.

Though we only have five registered sex offenders in town, two minutes away there are thousands of registered sex offenders who come in and out of town all the time,” he said.



Measures similar to the one being considered in Greenwich have been implemented in cities across the United States, and in Danbury, Brookfield, New Milford, Ridgefield and Windsor Locks. In Danbury, Brookfield and New Milford, signs are posted warning registered sex offenders to stay away from parks and other areas where children congregate. Ridgefield First Selectman Rudy Marconi said his town will have signs up in about two months. Only Windsor Locks decided not to post signs, but the city did send letters to its 17 registered offenders, making them aware of the ordinance.

State Senate Minority Leader John McKinney, R-Fairfield, and Rep. Lawrence Cafero, R-Norwalk, introduced a bill in the 2009 session that would have adopted the Adam Walsh Act, signed by President Bush in 2006, in Connecticut. The national act, named after the murdered young son of John Walsh, host of television’s America’s Most Wanted, includes so-called “no-fly zones” for sex offenders. Although the bill went nowhere this year, McKinney said he hopes to reintroduce it next year.

Look, there is obviously an extremely delicate balance between protecting the public and the constitutional rights and freedoms of individuals, whether they are convicted sexual predators or not,” he said. “The difficulty comes with the fact that this type of crime has an extraordinarily high recidivism rate, which justifies us in government taking greater steps toward protecting the public than we would with other crimes.”
- No it doesn't, show me the proof of high recidivism?  I can show you many that say otherwise, here and here.

McKinney’s contention that released sex offenders will likely offend again is contradicted by a variety of studies, according to Elizabeth Cafarella, director of public policy and communication for Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services, a statewide coalition of nine community-based rape crisis centers.

Cafarella said research has shown differing recidivism rates for sex offenders, ranging from a low of 5 percent to a high of about 30 percent. But she said what has been proven is that the more stable a sex offender’s life is, including supervision and monitoring, the less likely he is to reoffend. And she says ordinances like the one being considered in Greenwich can work against stability.

Residency restrictions can have unintended consequences, forcing offenders into rural areas where they become transient and can’t be monitored,” said Cafarella.

In fact, that’s exactly what happened in Georgia, Florida and Iowa, which have some of the toughest sex offender laws in the country. The New York Times reported in March 2006 that the number of registered sex offenders considered missing in Iowa tripled after a state law barring them from living within 2,000 feet of a school or daycare center was passed the previous September.

In 2007, CNN.com ran a story about a group of five registered sex offenders living under a bridge near Biscayne Bay after several Florida cities passed laws prohibiting them from living within 2,500 feet of schools, parks and other places children might gather. And earlier this year, USA Today reported on Georgia sex offenders taking to tent cities in the woods after the state banned them from “living, working or loitering” within 1,000 feet of places children gather.



_____, 38, is one of the five registered sex offenders living in Greenwich. He was convicted in 2002 of illegal possession of child pornography and voyeurism after he was caught in 2000 videotaping boys in the Greenwich High School swimming pool. He had also shot some footage in YMCA locker rooms.

Serving five years of probation with a 10-year suspended sentence, _____ was caught in 2006 loitering near a playing field at Old Greenwich School where a group of young boys was practicing football. But he was allowed to complete his probation rather than go to prison. He’s back in court now on charges that he didn’t keep the state properly informed of his whereabouts during 2007 to 2008.

_____ says he has been harassed with obscene phone calls, had his property vandalized and was fired from a job when news of his offenses came out. He’s unemployed and lives with his mother because he says no landlord will rent to him. Yet he put himself at the center of the recent debate in Greenwich, stepping forward to speak against the ordinance.

I was wrong, I deserved every day of my sentence,” said _____ in an interview last week. “But this [ordinance] goes way beyond a sentence and takes away the very things that are so meaningful to citizens; going to the park with your family on a summer’s day. I wouldn’t be able to do that for the rest of my life.”

Romeo complains that leaders on the RTM paid closer attention to _____ than the “town fathers.” The ordinance was referred back to the Legislative and Rules Committee without instruction, leaving its fate uncertain.

The board of selectmen, town attorney and board of education were all solidly behind this,” said a disappointed Romeo. “It’s out of my hands now. The RTM owns this now.”


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


FL - Holiday decoration crackdown for sex offenders

View the article here

10/07/2009

ST. JOHNS COUNTY - St. Johns County commissioners voted prohibit sexual offenders and sexual predators from participating in holiday activities where children could be present.

Sex offenders in St. Johns County can no longer put up decoration or dress up in costumes on Halloween and Christmas.

On Halloween, Offenders are also suppose to put signs up at their home saying there is "no candy or treats at the residence."

County Commissioner passed the ordinance 5-0.

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"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved