Thursday, October 1, 2009

FL - Miami-Dade Homeless Trust launches public campaign

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Book speaks in generalities... How big (or how small) are the portions that are used for the stated purposes? He might keep 99% of the money and his statements would still be true.

10/01/2009

By JULIE BROWN

The next time you see a panhandler on the street, instead of handing him or her a few dollars, the Miami-Dade Homeless Trust wants you to hand out a business card.

Not just any business card -- one that gives them the number for the county's homeless hot line, which connects them to people who can assist them with finding shelter and other services.

The trust, a nonprofit agency with a $41 million-a-year budget, launched a campaign Thursday to encourage citizens and businesses to stop giving money to people on the street and instead to give money to the trust.

"Most people don't know that all homeless people don't panhandle, and all panhandlers aren't homeless," said Ron Book, chairman of the trust. He said 100 percent of the money they receive will go toward homeless programs.
- And not all sex offenders are monsters Ron.  Boy, you really show your hypocrisy a lot!

A worsening economy, greater unemployment and government cuts have led to a rise in homelessness across the nation. In January, the Miami-Dade Homeless Trust counted 994 people living on the streets, compared to more than 1,300 in 2008. But the number of people living in shelters has risen, from 3,227 in 2008 to 3,339 in January.
- So how's that five year plan on eliminating homelessness working out for you Ron?

But this effort is largely targeted to the general public -- who, when confronted with a panhandler, often want to help but fear the money they shell out isn't being used to help homeless people.
- I personally would not give any money to this Homeless Trust, not while Ron is part of it (See here: Insurance Fraud, and here)

At a news conference, Book unveiled two unique, brightly colored containers into which citizens can drop money -- money that will go toward ending homelessness, he said.

The containers, one a six-foot pyramid-shaped "super meter," the other, a smaller device resembling a parking meter, were designed by world-famous artist Romero Britto. They are bright yellow, with painted flowers.

Book's goal is to have the large pyramid containers placed in malls, stadiums, office buildings and other businesses. The smaller meter-like gadgets will be placed on city streets.

He is hoping business and community leaders come forward to help contribute to the effort; The pyramid containers cost $1,200 to sponsor, and the meters are $1,000 each.

One area of focus for the trust in recent months is homeless convicted sex offenders who have been displaced by strict laws that prohibit them from living within certain distances of schools, playgrounds and other places that children congregate.

Last month, Book announced that the trust had received federal stimulus money, a portion of which will be offered to help sex offenders that have been living under the Julia Tuttle Causeway for several years.

Only a portion of the stimulus money will be contributed toward that cause, while the rest will go toward other homeless programs and services throughout the county.


"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


NY - Ex-cop Monte Montalvo pleads guilty in sex case

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Another cop, another slap on the wrist, compared to the average Joe who does the same.

09/30/2009

By Matt Gryta

Former Buffalo Police Officer Monte R. Montalvo closed the books on criminal prosecutions today by pleading guilty to a reduced sex crimes charge for molesting a 19-year-old college student two years ago.

Montalvo, 39, who was fired from the police department in January, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of third-degree attempted criminal sexual act (sodomy) before State Supreme Court Justice John L. Michalski. The plea forces Montalvo to register with the state as a convicted sex offender.

Michalski scheduled the misdemeanor sentencing for Jan. 13, but refused to give him a sentencing commitment on the charge, which carries a possible one-year term. On Jan. 11 Montalvo will be sentenced by U.S. District Judge William M. Skretney on gun charges for which he faces a likely federal prison term of between 15 to 21 months.

Michael G. O'Rourke, Montalvo's attorney, said the decorated former police officer, now living on a state disability pension due to police-work caused knee injuries, agreed to plead guilty to the misdemeanor charge because he "just wants to put this all behind him."

Rosanne Eimer Johnson, chief of the Erie County District Attorney's Special Victims Bureau, told Michalski the former college student who Montalvo tried to molest on Dec. 2, 2007 consented to the plea deal.

Montalvo, who now lives on Garden Village Drive in Cheektowaga, was allowed to remain free on previously posted bail. He declined comment as he left court today.

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"TThey who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


UK - The Unseen Threat From Female Paedophiles

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"TThey who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


KY - Supreme Court strikes down sex offender law

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Court Document (PDF)

10/01/2009

By Shawntaye Hopkins

The Supreme Court of Kentucky has ruled that a law limiting where registered sex offenders can live cannot apply to those who committed offenses before July 12, 2006, the day the law was implemented.

The law prohibits sex offenders from living within 1,000 feet of playgrounds, daycare centers and schools, and changed how the distance is measured.

The court, in a decision dated Oct. 1, said the law is punitive in nature and violates the ex post facto clause in the U.S. Constitution, which prohibits states from passing laws that increase punishment for old crimes.

In October 2006, authorities in Fayette County began knocking on doors and arresting sex offenders who were in violation of the law. At the time, there were 256 sex offenders in Fayette County and 180 were expected to move.

Most of them were living in older, urban neighborhoods inside New Circle Road. Downtown Lexington was virtually off limits.

Several registered sex offenders owned homes for years and were upset about being forced to move because of a new law.

Sex offenders across the state took their concerns to court only to receive varying opinions from judges.


"TThey who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


NPR - Roman Polanski - Opinion Roundup (09-30-2009)

Source Article (Leave a comment)

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"TThey who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


NY - Officials get update on registry rules

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09/30/2009

By Emily Stewart

Sex offender laws are complicated. They’re also constantly changing.

The state’s Sex Offender Registration Act became effective Jan. 21, 1996.

Since then, "it has changed every year to date," said Mark Spawn, director of research, development and training for the New York State Association of Chiefs of Police.

"It started with just a small number of registerable sex offenses," he said.

To keep law enforcement, parole and probation officials up to speed, the state Department of Criminal Justice held a sex offender management training course at the Dutchess County Sheriff’s Office on Tuesday. The session was one of 12 the department will hold across the state this fall.

About 30 officials from Dutchess, Putnam, Westchester, Orange and Rockland counties attended.

Natasha Harvin, supervising counsel for the state Office of Sex Offender Management, discussed topics such as who must register, what the penalties are if they don’t, fees associated with a sex offense conviction and sex offender risk levels and designations.

"A convicted sex offender wishing to live in New York state must register with the DCJS, even if that conviction occurred in another state or country, or in a military or federal court," she said.

She also went over the exceptions. For example, a conviction for patronizing a prostitute is not a registrable offense, unless the prostitute is under 17. But second-degree unlawful surveillance is registrable, unless the judge determines that registration is "unduly harsh," she said.

"SORA [the Sex Offender Registration Act] is very inconsistent. I’m aware of that," she said.

Next year, the state will implement the federal Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006. That will set new standards and "rewrite SORA," Harvin said.

As of Sept. 21, there were 29,393 registered sex offenders living in the state.

Of those, 225 live in Dutchess County; 101 are considered "level one," the lowest risk level assigned to registered offenders; 65 are level two offenders, and 57 are level three. The status of two are pending, Spawn said.

In Ulster County, there are 228 registered offenders, 110 of which are level one, 84 level two, 33 level three; and one is pending, he said.


"TThey who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


DC - Court to decide if sex offenders who didn't register in past can get enhanced penalties now

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09/30/2009

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court will decide whether sex offenders who didn't register with state officials before harsher punishments went into effect can still be sentenced to extra time in prison.

The high court on Wednesday agreed to hear an appeal from _____, who pleaded guilty to sexual abuse in Alabama. When released from prison in 2004, he moved to Indiana but didn't register with that state's sexual offender database.

The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act, which increased penalties for not registering, was not passed until 2006. But when _____ was arrested in 2007, he was charged using that law and sentenced to 37 months in prison. _____ appealed, saying prosecutors should not have used a law that wasn't in existence when he committed his crime.

But the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago said that when the law was passed, Congress did not say it did not apply retroactively.

Other courts have said that the law — SORNA — cannot be applied retroactively, and _____ wants the high court to resolve the conflict.

The case is Carr v. United States, 08-1301.


"TThey who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


FL - Killer of Jessica Lunsford dies of natural causes

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09/30/2009

TALLAHASSEE (AP) - Prison officials say a convicted sex offender on death row for kidnapping, raping and burying a Florida girl alive has died of natural causes.

After John Evander Couey abducted 9-year-old Jessica Lunsford, a native of Gastonia, from her bedroom in 2005, many states passed laws named after her that impose restrictions on sex offenders.

Department of Corrections spokeswoman Gretl Plessinger says Couey of natural causes Wednesday at a Jacksonville hospital. The 51-year-old had been sentenced to death in 2007.

Plessinger says Couey had been ill for some time. She declined to provide any specifics, citing a federal law protecting the privacy of hospital patients.

North Carolina Governor Mike Easley signed The Jessica Lunsford Act into law during the summer of 2008, making the state's laws tougher against sex offenders who assault children.

The Jessica Lunsford Act made several changes to North Carolina's sex offense, sex offender, and sex offender registration laws.

Under the state law, a sex offender who rapes a child under the age of 13 will get 25 years followed by lifetime satellite-based monitoring or the possibility of life imprisonment without parole.

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"TThey who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin (United States Constitution, Bill of Rights)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved