Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Videos of vigilantes beating people to death in the streets. I'm sure the vigilantes out there, like AZU, will "get off" on these videos!

People are always saying crime is wrong, yet when someone is accused of a sex crime, then we hear the hypocrites say "kill em' all!" And these same hypocrites are screaming about how wrong sex crimes are, which I agree with, but then they scream about "sex offenders should be raped in prison!" What a bunch of hypocrites we are in the USSA! Well, check out the video below. If this is what you want, we might as well start Islam's Shariah Law, and start the evil, sick killings. We claim to be a civilized country, well, if we did everything the public screamed, then I think we are all just as sick as the Radical Islamic folks who kill for fun! We might as well join all other third world countries, and go back to the stone age. Forget all the so called "progress" we've made. You cannot call something a crime, then wish a crime be committed on someone who commits a crime! A crime is a crime! Whoa to those who call good evil and evil good! KEEP IN MIND, THESE ARE FROM THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES WHERE VIOLENCE IS THE NORM!

WARNING: Graphic violence, discretion is advised!

Video Title: Rapist beaten to death in salvador city


Video Title: Angry Mob Beat Rapist


Video Title: Man Beaten By Neighbors For Raping 9-Year-Old Girl


Video Title: Child Killer Brutally Beaten By Cops Inside Police Station



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


OK - Debate Continues Over Death For Sex Offenders

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08/18/2009

Tulsa - The debate over whether the death penalty should be an option for repeat sex offenders is heating up.

One state lawmaker says yes and that he plans to introduce a bill to make it happen. But, not everyone is on board.

The move comes after the recent arrest of _____, a twice-convicted sex offender who is now being held in the Tulsa County Jail on a million dollars bond for allegedly abducting a two-year-old girl from her front yard.

Many people are asking how can a man who has two convictions for lewd molestation still be out on the streets?
- And how can people who took an oath to uphold the constitution, continually not stick to the oath they upheld?  The death penalty has been ruled unconstitutional many times, and should be used for those who kill others, in certain circumstances.  This, IMO, is just a man trying to make a statement for his own career, but, self centered egotistical idiots, will be idiots.

Being taken away in handcuffs isn't something new for the 56-year-old, who was convicted of lewd or indecent acts or proposals to a child in 1986 and lewd molestation in 1993.

On that 1993 conviction, _____ served less than 13 years of a 30-year sentence before being released.

Just last week, _____ was arrested after police found his truck in a field. Inside, police say _____ was found with his pants down. Next to him -- a partially dressed two-year-old girl he allegedly kidnapped from her home.

State Representative Rex Duncan wants to make sure that never happens again.

"As a father of daughters, this just screams out for some change, something different," Duncan says. "This guy is the Willy Horton of child rapists, child molesters. And, it should never have happened."
- You are right, no sexual abuse should ever happen, but it does, and will continue to do so, as long as people exist. You could kill every person who harmed anybody, but crime will still continue.  Like others have said, killing is not the answer, but prevention.

Duncan wants to make it tougher for sex offenders. His legislation would set the penalty for a first-time sex offender at life without parole. Prosecutors would be able to seek the death penalty for a second conviction.

"They need to die in prison so that Oklahoma families and parents will have the peace of mind and confidence to know that a _____ will never walk the streets again," Duncan says.
- This is just a pure idiotic statement.  Kill one person, others will follow.  So to help him feel better, he wants to kill people.  That is someone who should NOT be making and passing laws.

A similar bill passed in Oklahoma in 2006, but was shot down by the Supreme Court a year later. Duncan says his bill would be much more specific than that bill and thinks it would be upheld by the Supreme Court.

Sex abuse expert Sharon Doty agrees, but not when it comes to the death penalty. She believes life without parole would be a harsher punishment.
- You see, these laws are about punishment, and time and time again, they continue to admit that.  It's all about punishment and torture.

"They think their behavior is normal and appropriate," Doty says. "So, when that's what you're impacting something like the death penalty, I don't think is really going to be a deterrent."
- No, not all sex offenders think this way.  You take what a few say, and make it seem as if all think the same way, get a life.  You are no expert IMO.

She says the real answer is prevention -- educating children and adults to know what to look for.

"There is no cure for that," Doty says. "The only cure we have for this is prevention. So, we have to prevent either before they act or when they're convicted when they need to put them away and leave them there."

That's the outcome that may very well happen to _____ this time around.

Doty says several red flags that parents can use to spot a sex offender include people who always want to be alone with children, like offering private lessons or babysitting; people who think the rules don't apply to them, especially for new policies; and also people who let the child do things their parents don't, like eat junk food and play a certain video game.
- Another myth propagated by a person who claims to be an experts.  Not all sex offenders harm or are trolling for kids to molest, that is pure stupidity!  She claims to be an expert, sure doesn't seem like it to me, she, like many others, are running on emotion instead of facts.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


IN - Ind. high court asked to clarify sex offender ban

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08/18/2009

By CHARLES WILSON

INDIANAPOLIS - The Indiana Supreme Court is being asked to prevent an Indianapolis suburb from banning sex offenders from public parks in a case that could expand a trend of state court rulings finding constitutional problems with restrictions on sex offenders.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana (Contact) appealed a state Court of Appeals ruling that upheld Plainfield's ban last September. So far the high court hasn't said whether it will hear the case brought by a sex offender listed only as John Doe in court documents.

The case could join a handful of recent Indiana rulings on laws that restrict sex offenders' activities after they've done their time.

Last month, the Supreme Court ruled that a state law that prohibits convicted sex offenders from living within 1,000 feet of a school, public park or youth program center could not be used to force a sex offender to move from a home where he had lived for 20 years.

In April, the high court overturned a man's conviction for not registering as a sex offender because he had already completed a sentence for child molestation before the state's Sex Offender Registration Act was passed.

The Supreme Court has also been asked to hear the appeal of the Court of Appeals ruling in June that found Jeffersonville officials unconstitutionally applied a park ban against a man who no longer was required to register as an offender.

Joel Schumm, a professor at the Indiana University School of Law in Indianapolis, said Wednesday that Indiana appears to be more willing to consider such cases than other states where similar bans are generally upheld.

"The court's shown a willingness to take a hard and thoughtful look at these kinds of cases," he said.

Schumm said the ACLU of Indiana is simply asking the court to take the "next step" in restricting such ordinances by finding that Plainfield's ban also violates a state constitutional prohibition on excessive punishment.

Besides arguing that the ordinance retroactively increased the penalty for the plaintiff's original offense, the ACLU contends that the use of public parks is a constitutionally protected "core value" that all citizens have the right to enjoy unless they forfeit that right by committing a crime in a park.

"I think parks are a special place. I think parks exist for a specific reason, not just recreation, but it's a place where people are free to go and free to exist without undue government restriction without cause," said Ken Falk, legal director of the ACLU of Indiana.

Attorney Mel Daniel, who handled the appeal for Plainfield, said officials were just trying to keep parks safe in the Indianapolis suburb of about 28,000 when they passed the ordinance in 2002. The rule bans people listed on the state sex offender registry from the town's extensive park system.

Daniel said the sex offender ban was among several restrictions included in the ordinance, including prohibitions on weapons and alcohol. Registered sex offenders who visit the parks are subject to fines of $100 to $200.

"They have really taken safety in those parks seriously," Daniel said.

Supporters of similar bans argue the ordinances are needed to protect children because sex offenders have a high risk of repeat offenses. Opponents like the ACLU argue that the bans often unconstitutionally continue to punish individuals who already have served prison sentences and probation.
- I am so sick of hearing this "high recidivism rate" when studies show otherwise.

The plaintiff in the ACLU case was convicted in 2001 for child exploitation and possession of child pornography. He was released from probation in August 2004. He was visiting the Splash Island water park with his young son in June 2005, when police warned him not to return because he was listed on the sex offender registry.

"Our view is you can go anywhere you want to go, just not the park," Daniel said.

Falk countered: "There are lots of public places. Do we ban people from sidewalks? Do we ban people from public buildings?"

The Supreme Court's decision in the case could affect other Indiana communities. Officials in Lebanon, about 25 miles northwest of Indianapolis, is contemplating its own park ban, and the ACLU has put its lawsuit on hold against the Indianapolis suburb of Greenwood, which bans people convicted of certain sex-related and drug-related offenses from its parks.

More litigation will likely ensue until the high court clarifies the law, and it should "settle the law so that every community in Indiana will understand that the law is settled," the ACLU said in court documents.

The Plainfield case has been awaiting transfer to the high court for nine months, which is unusually long, said Schumm, the university professor. That might indicate the court is preparing an opinion or having trouble agreeing on what to do, he said.

If the Supreme Court doesn't hear the case, the Court of Appeals ruling upholding Plainfield's ordinance stands. If it does hear the case, the Supreme Court could reverse, uphold or modify the decision.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


MA - A split SJC says 2006 law violates rights of some sex offenders

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More detailed article here

08/18/2009

By John R. Ellement, Globe Staff

A bitterly divided Supreme Judicial Court ruled today that sex offenders convicted before 2006 cannot be forced to wear GPS devices if they violate probation or parole because it creates an unconstitutional burden on their freedom.

In a 4-3 decision, the majority said a 2006 law that requires GPS devices to be installed on all sex offenders placed on probation cannot apply retroactively.

Ruling in the case of a Bristol County man convicted in 1997, the majority said concerns about public safety must give way to constitutional protections against government intrusion into the lives of citizens, including sex offenders.
- No, the Constitution was created for abuse of power, just like you idiots are trying to do. Thank God there is one judge who still believes in the Constitution!

"The GPS device burdens liberty in two ways: by its permanent, physical attachment to the offender, and by its continuous surveillance of the offender's activities," Justice Margot Botsford wrote for the majority.

"We conclude that, as a result of the substantial burden on liberty [the 2006 law] imposes as part of the sentence for certain crimes, the statute is punitive in effect," Botsford wrote. "And because [the 2006 law] operates retroactively with respect to the defendant, its application to him is impermissible under the ex post facto provisions of the United States and Massachusetts Constitutions."

Joining Botsford in tossing out the retroactive application of the law were Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall and Justices Robert J. Cordy and Ralph D. Gants.

In the dissent, Justices Roderick L. Ireland, Judith A. Cowin, and Francis X. Spina said the use of GPS monitoring on probationers and parolees was a legally justified way to protect the public.
- Unconstitutional is not legal, and if you would read what "ex post facto" means, you'd see this is unconstitutional, just like this judge ruled.

"This court has stated that recidivism among sex offenders is high and protection of the public a compelling state interest," Ireland wrote. "This statute establishes a nonpunitive regime to protect the public."
- Well the court is wrong.  Recidivism among sex offenders is LOWER than any other criminal, see for yourself here.  Forcing someone off parole and/or probation to wear a GPS device, is punitive, and I could care less what this lady thinks.  If she had to live with one, she'd see it differently, you can count on that.

The ruling came in an appeal by _____, who plead guilty in Bristol Superior Court to indecent assault and battery on a child on Dec. 3, 1997, and was imprisoned for several years – and sentenced to 25 years probation. He was released from prison in May 2006, but failed to attend mandatory treatment and counseling sessions, the court said.

Just weeks after the 2006 law took effect, _____ was found in violation of probation and was placed on the GPS. According to the SJC, _____ has since been sent back to prison. _____ is a Level 3 sex offender, according to the Sex Offender Registry Board.

_____’s attorney, Theodore F. Riordan of Quincy, applauded the majority’s conclusion in a telephone interview today. "it’s a well-written decision," he said.

Riordan noted that the ban on retroactive punishments is part of the Bill of Rights and was included in the Massachusetts Declaration of Rights earlier.

"It’s really the people triumphing here," he said. "The ex post facto clause is working exactly like it should."

Riordan said being forced to wear a GPS device is a burden, both emotionally and physically for _____.

"It’s a big deal to wear a GPS device. It’s attached to you all the time," he said. "It’s unseemly to walk around with. It’s kind of like a Scarlet Letter. It made him feel like he had to stay in his house all the time. It’s not an insignificant issue."

In a companion case involving state parolees, the SJC applied its new thinking and barred the state Parole Board from using GPS devices on parolees whose convictions predated 2006.

"The language in the two statutes is substantially identical," the court said in an unsigned opinion. "Application of the statute to [parolees] in this case is impermissible."

In a statement, the Massachusetts Parole Board said a total of 82 paroled sex offenders are currently required to wear GPS devices. The agency said it will now review those cases to determine how many are directly affected by the judicial ban.

The court said it was not taking a position on the legality of the law when applied against people convicted after Dec. 21, 2006.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


Why Does Popular Culture Treat Prison Rape As a Joke?

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08/17/2009

By Anna Clark, AlterNet

Our attitudes towards sexual abuse in prison leads to a culture of permissiveness that destroys lives.

Believe it: There exists a board game called "Don’t Drop the Soap" in which players are tasked with fighting their way through a prison. John Sebelius designed it as a student at the Rhode Island School of Design. He is the son of Kathleen Sebelius, U.S. Secretary for Health and Human Services.

Gillius, Inc., the company selling Sebelius’ game online, promises a certificate of authenticity to the first 3,000 purchasers of the game that invites players to "steal painkillers from the nurse's desk in the Infirmary, avoid being cornered by the Aryans in the Shower Room, fight off Latin Kings in Gang War, and try not to smoke your entire stash in The Hole."

"The artistry of each handcrafted piece is matched with comparable humor & intelligence on every card. Stack your smokes, sharpen your shank, and get ready for an experience that only someone on the outside could appreciate." So goes the game’s promotional copy.

It’s certainly not the first time that rape in prisons is spun for humor (though perhaps it’s the first time that such humor is alleged as intelligent). Untold numbers of YouTube videos, Hollywood movies, and late night talk show monologues play off the soap meme. Meanwhile, Andy Borowitz just released the "Bernie Madoff edition" of his 2003 book, Who Moved My Soap?: The CEO's Guide to Surviving Prison.

This cartooning of abuse renders moot any sensitive and serious response to it. It’s also unique to abuse among male inmates; the ubiquitous caricature comes alongside a relative silence about rape in women’s prisons. There’s no soap-dropping counterpart "joke" referring to the abuse of female inmates. Ultimately, these distorted punch-line/silence memes enforce each other and perpetuate the reality of prison rape.

This isn’t news to Just Detention International, a nonprofit based in Los Angeles and Washington D.C. Once known as Stop Prison Rape, the survivor-led organization has challenged the perceptions, practices, and consequences of rape in prisons for twenty-nine years.

"Humor is part of the cultural attitude that (prison) is the one place where rape is okay," said Linda McFarlane, JDI’s deputy executive director.

McFarlane added that, "Jokes target the pain of a particular group of people and dehumanizes them. … It layers the discourse with a veil of acceptance."

This dehumanization trades on the well-being of the thirty-some individuals that write letters to JDI each week, telling their stories of abuse and asking for help. A 2007 survey from the Bureau of Justice Statistics found that nearly 1 in 20 inmates -- more than 60,500 people -- experienced some form of sexual abuse in the previous twelve months. That’s considered a conservative estimate since many survivors prefer not to admit the abuse they’ve suffered. As well, the study did not include people involuntarily detained in juvenile facilities, halfway houses, or immigration centers.

Given the prevalence of prison rape -- and the fact that there are 7.3 million people in prisons, jails and halfway houses across the U.S., most of which will return to their communities and all of which have a human right to safety -- the epidemic won national attention with the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003. PREA, which passed the House and Senate unanimously, was the first federal action that addressed prison rape. It convened the National Prison Rape Elimination Commission to delve deeper into the crisis and come up with a response.

After five years of comprehensive research, including an extensive public comment period, the NPREC presented its final report and proposed standards on June 23, 2009. While Congress proscribed the NPREC from making recommendations that required substantial money -- thereby torpedoing suggestions for single bunking and the redesign of prisons that are difficult to police -- a strong set of recommendations emerged.

Beginning with an attitude of zero tolerance for any kind of sexual abuse in any facility, the commission’s priorities include: improved hiring practices for facility staff; consideration of the inmates’ risk for rape (including physical stature, sexual preference, gender identity, and age) when placing them in bunks and programs; stringent internal and external oversight; staff training; and medical and mental health services for survivors.

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. has one year to examine the standards and, if adopted, put them into effect and enforce accountability in local, state, and federal detention facilities. JDI is among the organizations working to put these standards in place. The final standards will be binding for federal facilities, but not for state and local ones. However, correction systems that do not adopt the standards will have their federal funding cut by five percent.

More than just offering up common-sense protocols, the commission made a direct connection between the prevalence of prison rape and casual cultural rhetoric that accepts rape as part of a prison sentence.

"… (T)here is an attitude of indifference on the part of a lot of people who feel that just because somebody has committed a crime and they’re incarcerated that it’s appropriate for them to be abused while they’re in detention," said U.S District Judge Reggie B. Walton, the commission chair, at the June 23 press conference.

"We also have to change attitudes of the American populace about this problem. We cannot and should not tolerate jokes being made about prison sexual abuse. We should take offense when the movie industry produces movies that portray this as something that is a comedy. It’s not," Walton said. "The impact on the people who are abused is significant both physically and psychologically."

While Walton stressed the importance of hiring practices to select for those who recognize that "individuals who are incarcerated have basic human rights," it’s impossible to fathom that the enormous numbers employed in the U.S. corrections system could wholly escape the influence of "the veil of acceptance" perpetuated by a gendered dichotomy of jokes and silence about prison rape.

The fact is, while federal parties step up to face the pervasiveness of prison rape, public rhetoric is still mired in permissiveness -- and the NPREC standards cannot succeed until that changes.

"The rape crisis movement worked very hard to make it so rape is never okay, to say that no one deserves it," McFarlane said. "But … if you’re arrested, all bets are off. Survivors hear, ‘What did you expect? You’re in jail." They’re told to learn to fight. This is not acceptable."

McFarlane said that JDI focuses a great deal on facility response to rape, specifically how someone is treated when they report assault. When those who report are treated well, the message gets out to other inmates. When they aren’t treated well -- that is, when staff doesn’t separate the survivor from the perpetrator, or tells jokes in the hall, or treats the survivor in a punishing way -- then other inmates who suffer rape feel less safe reporting the crime and the message sent is that rape is acceptable.

Ultimately, McFarlane said, appropriate response to rape is part of prevention.

The culture of jokes about rape among male inmates is juxtaposed with a discomfiting quiet about abuse in women’s facilities -- a fact not addressed by NPREC as explicitly as it addressed the perception of male rape.

"There’s still a great deal of silence of sexual abuse in women’s institutions," said McFarlane. "But still sexual abuse happens at fairly even rates in male and female institutions, and rape is perpetuated by inmates in both of them."

There is almost zero acknowledgement of sexual abuse perpetuated among inmates in female facilities.

"The domestic violence movement had to work very hard to get battering in lesbian relationships taken seriously," said McFarlane.

But as is evident from the void of information about sexual violence perpetrated by female inmates, the relationship between the abused and the assaulter are still largely ignored -- and so, the abusive acts are ignored too. If anything, rape between female inmates is sexualized, as seen in such films as "Born Innocent," "99 Women," "They Call Her One Eye," "Last House on the Left," and "Chained Heat 2."

And it is here, in popular culture portrayals of prison rape, that we see most plainly how homophobia and misogyny are the foundations of the permissive public attitude about the abuse of inmates.

While sexual abuse and rape have nothing to do with sex, soap-dropping jokes and their ilk permit people to escape their discomfort with male-male sexuality by cloaking it in cheap laughs. In turn, female-female sexual abuse does not register as significant in any way -- unless it’s sexualized for the enjoyment of voyeurs. It’s a self-enforcing cycle -- misogyny affirms a narrow view of masculinity as "not womanish" that in turn creates a loathing for the feminization that is presumed to be implicit in male-male sexuality. This idea enforces the notion of femininity as something that is abnormal and lesser, which of course is a misogynistic attitude.

While female rape is ignored or exploited in popular culture, McFarlane said that the public is hearing more about officers who assault female inmates. Still, though, that issue remains politically loaded "because its not just involving prisoners. With prisoners assaulting each other -- it’s like, ‘put the animals in a cage and let them sort it out.’"

Michela Bowman is the Project Director for the Washington, DC office of the Vera Institute for Justice, a 47-year-old nonprofit center for justice policy and practice that the NPREC consulted while developing its standards and final report. She emphasized that the NPREC understands how public perception of prison rape impacts what actually happens inside the walls.

"The general apathy certainly serves to perpetuate (prison rape)," said Bowman.

She added, "The jokes people tell in their homes leads to the prosecutor that’s not willing to take a case of rape in a prison, not willing to see the rape as a crime rather than part of a punishment."

Bowman said that while the NPREC can’t enforce standards on public attitudes, she hopes it will bring national attention to the issue. And she has real reason to back up that hope. Bowman said the NPREC and PREA have resulted in more serious media coverage about prison rape -- coverage that doesn’t subscribe as neatly to the punch-line/silence dichotomy.

As well, Bowman said that she’s seen substantial attitude changes about prison rape within prisons themselves. Since the passage of PREA, she said, more grants have gone out and more programs have been initiated that target rape culture within facilities. In her frequent visits to prisons and jails, she said she hears how facilities are giving a great deal of attention to the issue.

"I think this is a case where the change will move from the inside out, rather than from the outside in," Bowman said.

Indeed, McFarlane said that there are some correctional departments that are very receptive to working with JDI to stave off prison rape culture. Not every facility sees rape as a laughing matter, she said. Indicative of the potential of positive partnerships was an op-ed in The Oregonian published on June 21 and co-authored by Max Williams, director of the Oregon Department of Corrections, and Lovisa Stannow, JDI executive director. The headline? "Rape is Not Part of the Penalty."

"PREA helped because it gave a federal mandate," McFarlane said. "There isn’t a prison, jail, or detention facility that can say it doesn’t have to deal with (stopping prison rape)."

McFarlane acknowledges that there is a "really, really long way to go" before the public adopts the same zero tolerance attitude towards prison rape that the NPREC expects from all people directly involved with detention facilities. But she said she’s noticed that the pushback against permissive attitudes is growing stronger and more intersectional.

"Our organization is working with other organizations including rape crisis centers and LGBT groups that understand that this issue impacts all of our work," McFarlane said. "We cherish and count upon our colleagues doing this work."

"I couldn’t say for sure that there are fewer jokes, and movies referring to rape as humorous (today, compared to ten years ago)," McFarlane added. "I don’t know that. But I know there’s responses to them coming from people other than us."


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


NC - Church sends kids away

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08/17/2009

By JESSE JAMES DECONTO

RALEIGH -- One church has dealt with a new law banning sex offenders from within 300 feet of child-care facilities by moving children's programs off site.

St. John's Metropolitan Community Church on Glenwood Avenue made the decision last fall, because one of its members would have had to stop worshipping on Sundays.

"At our church we believe that we should have the doors open to everybody," said member Stan Kimer, first vice president of the N.C. Council of Churches. "That's one of the purposes of church is to take people in that society might reject. ... You're almost taking someone who's down and preventing him from doing the things he needs to do to move on with his life."

With their parents

Kimer said St. John's typically has fewer than 10 children at a service. They usually stay in the sanctuary with their parents during worship anyway, leaving only for occasional special programs. Such special events now occur while the sex offender is not present or at off-site locations such as parents' homes.

The offender was convicted of indecent liberties with a child, obscene literature and immorality with a minor in 1986 and second-degree sexual exploitation of a minor in 1997, according to state records.

Kimer said the man has been out of prison for several years and helps to lead music, teach adult classes and serve the church in other ways.

"He wanted to change his life," said Kimer. "His being at church was a very important part of his rehabilitation."


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


TX - Mom Gets 99 Years for Cutting Off Son's Genitals

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08/18/2009

HOUSTON — A Houston-area mother convicted of mutilating her infant by cutting off his genitals two years ago was sentenced Monday to 99 years in prison.

But minutes after the jury's sentence was read, Katherine Nadal, 28, yelled out that she did not hurt her son, prompting the boy's father to storm out of the courtroom.

Jurors deliberated for two hours Monday night before returning the sentence, which also included a $10,000 fine. The same jury had convicted her last week of first-degree felony injury to a child.

The jurors chose among possible sentences ranging from probation to life in prison. Nadal, who shook her head as the jury foreman read the sentence, will have to serve at least 30 years before she is eligible for parole.

Prosecutors asked for life in prison. Nadal's attorneys did not request a specific sentence, instead asking the jury to not punish her out of hate or revenge.

Nadal had claimed the family dog, a 6- to 7-pound dachshund named "Shorty" was responsible for mutilating her then-5-week-old son, Holden Gothia, as he slept in his parent's bedroom in March 2007 at their suburban Houston apartment.

But prosecutors said she was high on drugs when she mutilated her son with an unknown sharp instrument. Authorities say Nadal, who had prior drug arrests, tested positive for cocaine, methadone and Xanax after the attack.

Holden survived, but the severed body parts were never found.

After the sentence was announced, Holden's paternal aunt, Patches DeShazo, who has custody of the now 2-year-old boy, read a victim impact statement in the courtroom.

"I am thankful by time you are eligible for parole you will be beyond childbearing years. It makes me crazy to this very day to hear you say I did not hurt him," DeShazo said as she read her statement.

That prompted Nadal to yell back from the table where she sat with her defense attorneys: "I failed him. I did not hurt him."

The boy's father, Camden Gothia, then stood up and yelled to Nadal, "You abused him when he was in the womb," a reference to Nadal having taken drugs when she was pregnant with Holden. Gothia then left the courtroom.

DeShazo and her husband were given custody after his parents relinquished their rights. His father sees him regularly.

After the hearing, prosecutor Tammy Thomas told reporters that Nadal will never admit what she did.

"I don't know if this is justice to merit the damage," a teary-eyed Thomas said. "This is as close as we can get."

Allen Isbell, one of Nadal's attorneys, said he was disappointed that the sentence was "so long."

During closing arguments in the punishment phase of the trial, Thomas told jurors that Nadal had sentenced her child to a life of pain and suffering. "She took his identity as a human being and either flushed it or threw it in a trash can," Thomas added.

Doctors testified that he faces years of surgeries and counseling.

Nadal's attorneys told jurors that nothing they did would help Holden.

"This jury must punish Katie Nadal. That's your job. But what is appropriate? I hope you don't do it out of hate or revenge," defense attorney Skip Cornelius said.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


GA - Authorities plan to interview registered sex offenders in Georgia

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"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


Scientists Learn To Fabricate DNA Evidence

View the article here

08/18/2009

By kdawson

From the tossing-a-bag-of-maryjane-in-the-back-seat dept

Hugh Pickens writes:

"The NY Times reports that it is possible to fabricate blood and saliva samples containing DNA from a person other than the donor, and even to construct a sample of DNA to match someone's profile without obtaining any tissue from that person — if you have access to their DNA profile in a database. This undermines the credibility of what has been considered the gold standard of proof in criminal cases. 'You can just engineer a crime scene,' said Dan Frumkin, lead author of the paper. 'Any biology undergraduate could perform this.' The scientists fabricated DNA samples in two ways. One requires a real, if tiny, DNA sample, perhaps from a strand of hair or a drinking cup. They amplified the tiny sample into a large quantity of DNA using a standard technique called whole genome amplification. The other technique relies on DNA profiles, stored in law enforcement databases as a series of numbers and letters corresponding to variations at 13 spots in a person's genome. The scientists cloned tiny DNA snippets representing the common variants at each spot, creating a library of such snippets. To prepare a phony DNA sample matching any profile, they just mixed the proper snippets together. Tania Simoncelli, science adviser to the American Civil Liberties Union, says the findings were worrisome. 'DNA is a lot easier to plant at a crime scene than fingerprints,' says Simoncelli. 'We're creating a criminal justice system that is increasingly relying on this technology.'"


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


Luckless Predator Only Attracted to Undercover Cops

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Yet more proof the vigilante geek squad Perverted-Justice is not needed.

08/14/2009

By Kevin Poulsen

It’s official. There’s nobody in the chat rooms but pedophiles and undercover police.

On Thursday, a federal appeals court upheld the conviction of an Indiana man whose online efforts to proposition underage girls led him to not one, not two, but three undercover cops, none of whom apparently knew about the others.

The case began in August 2006, when aspiring sexual predator _____ started an online conversation with Amanda_13, a fake 13-year-old girl voiced by Sergeant Richard Howard of the Porter County Sheriff’s Department.

After several highly explicit chats, _____ asked Amanda_13 to meet him at a park in Valparaiso, Indiana, to have sex. When he showed up, he was arrested for inducing an individual under 18 to engage in criminal sexual activity.

When Secret Service agents searched _____’s computer, they found logs of chats with two other apparent minors, who described themselves as 13 and 15 years old, respectively. Federal prosecutors introduced the chats at _____’s trial as evidence of his perverted motives.

Supposedly, it was only after _____ was convicted that the feds realized that one of those girls, daisy13_Indiana, was also a cop working the very same Secret Service operation. They informed _____’s attorney, who appealed on the grounds that the government improperly withheld information that would have proven entrapment.

The case became even more bizarre when the three-judge appellate panel reviewing the conviction saw the screen name of the third supposed teenager, blonddt, and recognized it from an earlier case.

To our surprise, the government was unaware until this panel told it at oral argument that the other screen name, blonddt, was also an officer from the Indiana operation,” wrote Judge Diane Wood (.pdf) on Thursday.

Despite the prosecutorial missteps, the panel upheld _____’s conviction, ruling that the additional chat logs still showed his intent to commit a crime. _____ is serving a sentence of 17-and-a-half years in prison, followed by supervised release for life.

There’s no evidence in the record that he ever succeeded in talking with a real underage girl.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


GA - Miley Cyrus Stalker Mark McLeod Arrested Again in Georgia

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08/18/2009

TYBEE ISLAND -- A 53-year-old man charged with attempting to stalk Miley Cyrus is scheduled to head back to court on Tybee Island, where the teen superstar just finished shooting a movie on the Georgia coast.

_____ is scheduled to appear in court for a preliminary hearing Tuesday afternoon. He's being held at the Chatham County jail on misdemeanor charges of attempted stalking, disorderly conduct and obstruction of a police officer.

Police say _____ twice came to Tybee Island looking for 16-year-old Cyrus and tried to breach a security perimeter around the movie set in June. Police say _____ told an officer he was secretly engaged to marry the "Hannah Montana" star.
- Which brings another question, why didn't they arrest her boyfriend for child molestation?  She was underage and he had sex with her, from other news articles. (See Here, And Here)

Cyrus finished filming the movie "The Last Song" on Tybee Island last week.

Video Link



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


Xavier Von Erck of Perverted-Justice, says they do not accept donations! (Yeah right!)

At 4:30 in the video below, Xavier states:

"Unlike Julie Posey, we don't take donations. We don't ask for money. We haven't turned our group into a link to our own online store"
- Check out this link, and here.

Video Link



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


MN - Minn. Officer Sentenced For Possessing Child Porn

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08/17/2009

NEW RICHMOND (WCCO) - A former Minnesota police officer was sentenced to prison in Wisconsin after pleading guilty to two counts of possessing child pornography.

Anthony Miller of New Richmond was sentenced Monday to 14 years on the first count and 15 years on the second. They will be served concurrently.

State prosecutors say altogether he will spend about five years in prison followed by 10 years of supervised release.

In addition, he must register as a sex offender, must not have contact with any child under 18 years old without written approval and meet other conditions.

DOJ says Miller worked as an officer in Hastings, Minn., for 11 years and admitted he downloaded and traded pornographic pictures of children while on the job.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


NC - Sex offender can't worship sent to jail for attending church!

View the article here

08/18/2009

By JESSE JAMES DECONTO

Law meant to protect children

_____ said he was flabbergasted when a Chatham County sheriff's deputy arrested him in March for a simple weekly activity -- going to church.

_____, 31, had served six years in prison for indecent liberties with a teenage girl and attempted second-degree rape. He was released last September and started attending Moncure Baptist Church. He met with the pastor, disclosed his crimes and often sat in the front row for worship.

But after the Chatham Sheriff's Office (Email) investigated an alleged sexual assault by another person in the church parking lot in March, _____ was arrested because he was attending the church, which has a child-care facility on its premises.

"Anyone in this world has a right to practice their religion, and whether they've made any mistake in their life, they should have the right," _____ said.

But a state law that took effect in December forbids registered sex offenders from being within 300 feet of a school, playground, day care or children's museum.

"The law we passed doesn't let them go to church, because there are nurseries in churches," said state Rep. Verla Insko (Email), D-Chapel Hill, the only legislator in the House and Senate to oppose the law.

_____, with the help of the American Civil Liberties Union (Email), is challenging the law in Chatham County. A coalition of social workers and psychologists who treat sex abusers have been fighting it in the General Assembly. Some think churches should play a key role in rehabilitating offenders.

Proponents, though, want to keep sexual offenders away from children at all costs, even after they've finished their prison time.

'Lost their rights'

"As far as I'm concerned, they've lost all their rights -- to go to church ... to go to McDonald's to get a cheeseburger if they've got the slides," said state Sen. David Hoyle (Email), the Gastonia Democrat who sponsored the law. "They have made that choice. They have imposed that on themselves. I didn't."
- You did, by passing draconian unconstitutional laws! Remember the first amendment?  Also, why can't the parents taking their kids to McDonalds, be a parent and watch their kids?  If they would do that, then their kid would not be a victim of some person wanting to harm them, but no, they want Big Brother to "protect" them.


_____' lawyer, Glenn Gerding, calls the law unconstitutional because it infringes on his client's freedom to exercise religion. He said the law applies even if an offender is merely sitting on a pew and no children are in the building.

Katy Parker, North Carolina legal counsel for the ACLU, said her agency has taken about 50 phone calls from pastors and registered sex offenders since the law took effect. She said law enforcement officials have told pastors they can't allow sex offenders to attend church. She also has heard of offenders being arrested for exercising at a YMCA.

_____ appears to be one of the few offenders arrested for being on church grounds, though there clearly are other offenders attending worship. Eric Sipe, a sex-abuse therapist in Catawba County, said sheriff's departments vary in how they enforce the law.

_____ recently moved to Sanford, where he started attending Try Jesus Ministries. The church has children's programs, but _____ said law officers are more understanding. Last weekend, he went with fellow church members on a retreat to Tennessee.

"I go to church anytime I get a chance," said _____. "I believe in it. It helps me keep my mind on track. It helps me be a better person not just to myself but to someone else."

Hoyle, the law sponsor, said he doesn't have a problem if pedophiles go to church, as long as there aren't children there.
- Not all sex offenders are pedophiles you idiot!

"It's a recipe for them to find victims," he said. "Find another church that they don't have a nursery. I'm sure there are a lot of churches that don't have nurseries."

Gerding, _____' lawyer, argues that churches are precisely where offenders need to be. "Churches are often the last hope for many sex offenders who need the stability and guidance a church pastor and church family can provide," Gerding wrote in his motion.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


CO - Evans to vote on restricting where sex offenders can live

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08/18/2009

Registered sex offenders pondering a move to Evans may soon have to think twice about where they plan to live in the city.

The Evans City Council will vote tonight on whether to restrict areas where registered sex offenders can live to places 750 feet from where children normally are found, including schools and parks. Along with the residency ordinance, the council also will consider banning registered sex offenders from loitering around such places.

Registered sex offenders already living in the areas would be allowed to stay.

The adoption of similar measures is beginning to pick up steam in Colorado, though the constitutionality and effectiveness of such measures have come into question.

In January, the Greeley City Council voted to approve a similar 750-foot residency restriction along with the loitering restriction. Commerce City, Englewood and Greenwood Village also have passed such measures, though Englewood has met resistance as its 2,000-foot restriction means there is virtually no place in the city where such offenders can live.

Critics such as Taylor Pendergrass, a staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado (Email), have said such measures only offer a false sense of security.

Evans Police Chief Rick Brandt said, however, that he hopes residents stay vigilant against crimes of sex offenders.

I also believe that a person's perception about how safe they are in the community is very important,” Brandt said. “And if people feel safer in their communities, I think we're doing a good job keeping our community safe and a good place to live.”


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


AZ - Officer allegedly sends lewd photos to strangers, gets NO PUNISHMENT!

View the article here

View the video at the link above.

08/18/2009

By Jared Dillingham

MARICOPA – A police officer was fired after allegedly showing lewd pictures of himself to strangers.

3TV just got a stack of documents outlining the allegations against Officer Martice Berry. He is not being charged with any crimes, just conduct unbecoming of an officer and it is enough for the City of Maricopa to fire him.

Witnesses started coming forward over the last few months-claiming officer Berry was taking pictures of his genitals on his cell phone before sending them to women trying to convince them to have sex with him.

The Internal Affairs report says the officer's unprofessional behavior happened while on duty.

Investigators say Officer Berry hit on a number of women using his job to get dates, once while investigating a suicide and two other times at Maricopa City Hall.

The officer is also accused of harassing two married couples and hitting on a 16-year-old girl who he kissed at a gym.

When confronted with the allegations in June, Officer Berry denied them but his bosses thought he was lying and he has now been fired.

One of the investigating officers reports Officer Berry was found guilty of doing the same thing at his last law enforcement job in Michigan.
- And now he's free to do it again!


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


FL - Sex Offender Decries Shelter Access Denial

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08/17/2009

By Jeremy Maready

LAKELAND - If a hurricane strikes Polk County, _____ won't be welcome at any of the county's public shelters.

The 33-year-old Lakeland resident is a registered sexual offender.

And while he has served his 10-year prison sentence, _____ still can't shake the stigma of his crime.

"I'm civilly dead," he said. "In a disaster, you find places for animals to go, but not people? You dehumanize me by telling me I can't go to a shelter."

_____, who maintains he was wrongly accused, said he was released from prison two years ago and has tried to turn his life around. He is married, is the father to three children, the oldest of whom is 9 years old, and has another on the way.

"The real big issue is because I have a family," _____ said of the shelters. "If I didn't have a family, it wouldn't bother me."

Sheriff Grady Judd (And check out this article) said _____'s wife, Tara Decosey, and their children are welcome to stay at a public shelter if they need to, but _____ must fend for himself.
- This man is so corrupt.  See the second link above to see what I am talking about.

_____, who was convicted of raping his ex-girlfriend and other charges in 1996, recently picked up a Polk County Sheriff's Office pamphlet that detailed what sexual offenders should do in a hurricane.

The brochure outlines the limited options for sexual offenders.

If an offender is on probation, they are to contact Florida's Department of Corrections for emergency shelter at DOC facilities.

If they aren't on probation, "As a sexual offender or predator, you will not be admitted to public shelters in Polk County," the pamphlet reads.

"We're not going to let them into our hurricane shelter," Judd said. "They have lost that privilege."

But Judd said this is not a new rule and offenders are notified of their limitations when they register.

"This is something he has known all along," Judd said of _____. "He needs to stop complaining and find a place to stay."

But _____ argued about why those convicted of other violent crimes, like murder and aggravated battery, would be allowed at shelters and he isn't.

"It's not like I did something to a child," he said.

Judd cited research that shows a high recidivism rate among sexual offenders, as opposed to others convicted of other violent crimes.
- Well like usual, Judd is an idiot, and is using sound bites instead of facts to justify his torture of ex-sex offenders.  See the studies here, which show LOW recidivism rates.

"The last thing a person or family should have to worry about is if the person sleeping next to them or their children is a sexual offender," Judd said.

The rules for the public shelters are set by the Sheriff's Office and the Polk County School Board.

And because all of Polk's shelters are housed in public schools, the Jessica Lunsford Act prevents sexual offenders from staying there, said Paul Womble, the county's emergency operations program manager.

There have been no discussions among county leaders to create any shelter specifically for sexual offenders, he said.

"We don't have any shelters in the county that aren't public schools," Womble said.

Because state law dictates building standards for shelters, few buildings outside of schools meet the criteria.

Until a shelter is created, sexual offenders will have to seek refuge elsewhere in Polk.
- So in other words, if a hurricane comes, you are s--t out of luck!


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


FL - Some sex offenders find housing

View the article here

It looks like Florida is just going to play the shuffle game, like California has been doing for about 4 years now.  See the second video below.  He's probably paying for a months rent for these folks, to get them out from under the bridge, but without a job, in a month it will be the same issue again. If he's actually helping, like it says, then this is good, but I doubt that is the case.

08/18/2009

By JULIE BROWN and JOSE PAGLIERY

Progress is being made in relocating convicted sex offenders from the Julia Tuttle Causeway, but advocates still need more housing options.

The number of homeless convicted sex offenders who set up an encampment under the Julia Tuttle Causeway is slowly dwindling, but activists say they still need affordable housing for the many who still remain.

At its height, about 70 sexual offenders and predators -- as well as some other homeless people -- lived under the bridge, attracting unflattering national media attention for Miami. Now there are fewer than 50 people.

Two left Monday, with the help of Ron Book, chairman of Miami-Dade's Homeless Trust, who has sought to relocate residents.

It's no easy task.

Most local laws require sex offenders to live at least 2,500 feet away from where children congregate: schools, playgrounds, parks and even some libraries. The laws are being challenged on a variety of legal fronts.

The area under the bridge is controlled by the state Department of Corrections, and government officials in both Miami and Miami-Dade County have urged the state to remove the dwellers.

Some have left on their own accord, tired of the media attention. Others, however, have received help from Book and his agency, which helps provide shelter and treatment for the homeless.

In recent weeks, the agency has run several ads in local newspapers calling on all willing owners of local housing units to contact the agency.

Book said the agency will receive federal stimulus money in September to help jobless or underemployed offenders afford their own homes. The agency has agreed to pay for the first and last month's rent at every offender's newly acquired housing unit -- and, if needed, could pay for several more months.

All the offenders would have to do is comply.

But it's not that simple. Some don't want to move -- that is, with the agency's help.

For two men who call themselves Reggie and Joey, their defiance sprouts from distrust: They said they've heard these promises before. And while release from the fetters of makeshift shanties, colorful tents and cardboard boxes sounds tempting, they say it's not real.

"I should have been in an apartment three weeks ago," Joey said Monday.

The 36-year-old said the agency promised him a check after he found a suitable apartment. The check never came, and the landlord refused to work with the agency, causing the rental agreement to dissolve, he said.

Book acknowledges there have been setbacks, but blames the resistant offenders for not taking part in the program.

"We're serious about resettling these folks," he said. "We're going to move as aggressively as possible to do what we can."

Book points to a couple -- a sex offender husband who lived under the bridge and his nonoffender wife -- who were transported to a new location Monday morning. Days earlier, a handful of others were moved to affordable housing.

Book has explored about 95 different properties, noting he got a tremendous response from ads placed in The Miami Herald and a few other local papers.

"We received several dozen calls, so we felt it was a good investment," Book said. "Our staff is pursuing locations, some of which may work, some that don't comply with the law . . . but I have different needs in different parts of the community."

He said some of the offenders have jobs in the restaurant industry and need to have access to transportation.

The North Miami-Dade Correctional facility remains an option, but cannot be the sole solution, he said.

"We have a population that is somewhat selective where they are willing to live," he said. "But there is going to come a time when we may be out of housing and they may be out of luck."

Video Link


Video Link



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved