Monday, August 17, 2009

FL - The Wrong Way to Handle Sex Offenders

View the article here

08/17/2009

By Jeff Hoard

I am sure there will always be a debate about how communities should deal with sex offenders, here I won’t offer any suggestions on that front. What I will offer in this post is the incorrect for communities to deal with sex offenders.

I believe Miami Florida has offered a real time example of exactly how an Idiocratic state would deal with sex offenders.

Video Link


Over two years ago CNN reported on how new laws intended to keep sex offenders from living 2,500 feet away from places where children congregate, that effectively made it living homeless under the Julia Tuttle causeway as the only option. In 2007 when CNN printed in that story there were 5 sex offenders living under the bridge, now there are between 80 and 100.

BBC turned the Miami sex offender policy into an international story after they recently visited the bridge and spoke to a crime expert who noted that all studies indicate this is possibly the worst way to rehabilitate criminals and bring them back into society. Under these conditions the criminals on parole are more likely to re-offend and/or abscond.

Video Link


Call me crazy, but forcing legions of sex offenders to live under a bridge is a pretty bad idea, the fact that this has been the norm for over 2 years in Miami is mindblowing. Because it’s taken so long for a solution to be hammered out by politicians (for starters lower the radius? perhaps?) the ACLU has decided to challenge it in the courts.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


UK - 'Vigilante' fear over fire attack

View the article here

08/17/2009

By Richard Marsden

EIGHT members of a South Yorkshire family - including four young children - were almost killed by arsonists who may have targeted their house mistaking it for the home of a sex offender.

Firefighters said the occupants of the property were "very, very lucky" to have escaped from the end terrace house, in Boswell Close, Rossington, Doncaster.

After the door was set alight at about 3am yesterday, flames spread into the hallway and staircase - sending thick smoke throughout the private, rented property.

Three women, aged 49, 33 and 18, a 29-year-old man and four children, two girls and two boys of eight, four, two and one, were asleep upstairs but woken by a smoke alarm, which had recently been installed by the fire service.

Finding their escape route blocked, two of the adults leapt from a rear window on to a mattress in the garden and the children were lowered down. Neighbours, who had been woken by the smoke alarm and residents' screams, then rushed to the scene. They helped drag a trampoline, which had been further up the garden, under the window, so the remaining adults could jump to safety.

South Yorkshire Fire Service crew manager Stuart Bartley said: "They were very, very lucky to escape. I think it just shows the benefits of having smoke alarms installed."

The occupants were taken to Doncaster Royal Infirmary, requiring treatment for smoke inhalation and injuries suffered while jumping from the house.

Three of the adults and all four children were later discharged but the 49-year-old woman remains in hospital with two broken ankles.

All eight were from the same family but not all lived at the house - some are believed to have been staying the night.

Residents of Boswell Close said the family had only been living at the house for about two months - and did not even know their names.

But the neighbour who went to help with his wife said: "We were woken by the smoke alarm and hearing them screaming and shouting. When we got round, two of the adults were down and they had already got the kids out. We just helped them drag the trampoline down the garden so the others could escape."

"It's quite worrying. The fire could have been worse and could have spread."

Neighbours said they feared the property was mistakenly targeted by vigilantes looking for _____, 32, who last week pleaded guilty to making indecent images of children at Doncaster Crown Court.

_____, who is yet to be sentenced, has since moved out of the street and her old home is boarded up.

A South Yorkshire Police spokesman confirmed officers knew of the suggestion the arsonists intended to target _____'s house. He said: "We are looking into the allegation as part of our enquiries." But he added: "We would can confirm that _____ has now left the area."

Anyone with information should contact Det Con Andy Gray at Doncaster CID on 01302 385630.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


The Emerging Criminal War on Sex Offenders



The Emerging Criminal War on Sex Offenders

The John Marshall Law School

August 16, 2009

Abstract:
This article addresses four central questions. First, what is the difference between normal law enforcement policy and a “war” on crime? Second, assuming such a line can be discerned, has the enactment of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act (“AWA”) in combination with other sex offender laws triggered a transition to a criminal war on sex offenders? Third, if such a criminal war is emerging, what will be the likely effects of such a transition? Fourth, if such a criminal war is emerging with substantial negative consequences, can it be stopped?

By reviewing America’s history of criminal wars, primarily in the War on Drugs, the article identifies three essential characteristics of a criminal war: marshaling of resources, myth creation, and exception making. It concludes that the federalization of sex offender policy brought about by the AWA elevated law enforcement to a nascent criminal war on sex crimes. This change could have repercussions as substantial as the drug war has had on American criminal justice and society.

Excerpt - Exception Making
Just as in international wars, criminal wars are marked by deviations from normal codes of conduct. With the recent international War on Terror, there have been debates about the permissibility of torture, inapplicability of the Geneva Conventions, application of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, and the utilization of private corporations in acquiring personal information of citizens. The mentality of exception making in the War on Terror culminated in the oft-stated belief that “the Constitution is not a suicide pact.” Thus, constitutional guarantees of liberty were to be sacrificed when policymakers perceived a threat to national security.

Similarly, in criminal wars, exceptions are crafted into normal law enforcement rules. In the constitutional context, it has been argued extensively that the War on Drugs has created a substantial set of exceptions to the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments. However, the First Amendment’s protections for speech and free exercise of religion have also been subject to unusual exceptions due to the drug war. Even the right to bear arms under the Second Amendment has not been unscathed by the War on Drugs. The drug war also expanded federal criminal jurisdiction in ways that required another exception to the new federalism that emerged to temporarily revive the Commerce Clause as a means to limit federal jurisdiction.

Outside of the constitutional context, law enforcement was given a variety of weapons unique to the drug war context. The emergence of heavily armed SWAT teams, inter-departmental and inter-governmental coordination, aerial surveillance, and extensive sting operations are the result of the War on Drugs. Further, the growth of federal criminal law can largely be attributed to the desire to stamp out drug distribution and use in the United States.

This exception-making attribute of criminal wars has long-term effects beyond the immediate scenarios which were used to justify the exceptions. Once the government gained the exceptional tools used in the drug war, it was able to use those tools in other contexts as well. The constitutional and non-constitutional exceptions eventually became the rule. Now, SWAT teams are utilized in a variety of situations, the Fourth Amendment has lost its force in many cases, the federal government is free to pass criminal laws without any concern about the Commerce Clause, and undercover operations are used for any high-priority law enforcement project. What started as exceptions supported by “unique” circumstances have become tools available outside of the drug war context.



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


Sexual Predators: NOT an Internet Threat to Kids

View the article here

08/16/2009

By Michael Castleman

The actual threat is negligible.

Take one newly pervasive communications medium that makes some people apprehensive. Add concern about sexual exploitation of children that makes everyone apprehensive. Stir in a few highly publicized cases of pedophiles luring innocent young kids to horrible fates via email or Facebook. Season with echoes of Hansel and Gretel. And what comes out of the oven? Full-blown hysteria that every child with an Internet connection faces substantial risk from sexual predators.

The hysteria may be real. But the actual threat is negligible.

Last year, the attorneys general of 49 states created the Internet Safety Technical Task Force to investigate sexual solicitation of children by molesters who troll for targets using sites popular with kids, among them, MySpace and Facebook. The 278-page report concluded that there's no real problem.

The task force, led by Harvard researchers, looked at reams of scientific data dealing with online sexual predation and found that children and teens were rarely propositioned for sex by adults who made contact via the Internet. In the handful of cases that have been documented-and highly publicized-the researchers found that the victims, almost always older teenagers, were usually willing participants already at risk for exploitation because of family problems, substance abuse, or mental health issues.

The report concluded that MySpace and Facebook "do not appear to have increased minors' overall risk of sexual solicitation." The report said the biggest risk to kids using social networks was bullying by other kids.

"This study shows that online social networks are not bad neighborhoods on the Internet," said John Cardillo, whose company tracks sex offenders. "Social networks are very much like real-world communities that are inhabited mostly by good people who are there for the right reasons."

Not all the participating attorneys general agreed with the report's conclusions. Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal (Contact) charged that "thousands" of convicted sex offenders are members of social networking sites.
- Yeah, so?  Just because a sex offender is a member of a social network, doesn't mean they are out trolling for kids to molest.  This man is the typical fear-monger, who basis his opinions on feelings and not on hard facts.  And the task force created by 49 attorney generals, even said it was blown out of proportion, but he claims to know more than many experts.  Sounds like he has a huge ego to me!

That may well be true, but most "convicted sex offenders" are not predators who molest children. In most states. "sex crimes" include exhibitionism, voyeurism, public urination, transvestism, even ownership of a vibrator. In addition, in some states 18-year-old men have been convicted of statutory rape, a sex crime, for having sex with their fully consenting 17-year-old girlfriends.

Meanwhile, in the small number of cases where child molesters have connected with children online, most of the encounters have followed a predictable pattern: online contact, leading to telephone contact, ultimately leading to face-to-face meetings. But notice that those who are up in arms about the supposed hazards of social networking sites seem unconcerned about the key role that the telephone plays in the sexual exploitation of children. Why is that?

I think it's because the telephone is an old technology fully integrated into our culture. The Internet is still new, and kids use it more than adults, which makes many adults nervous that something nefarious must be going on. But according to the attorneys general report, next to nothing is.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


PA - Residents chase, beat sex assault suspect

View the article here

It's one thing to chase and catch the person, but to assault him? They should be locked up for assaulting a person. That is taking it into vigilantism!

08/16/2009

PHILADELPHIA (UPI) -- Philadelphia residents allegedly beat a sexual assault suspect they caught and held until police arrived, a Philadelphia police spokesman said.

The man, whose name was not reported, was chased Saturday night by residents who said they believed he had sexually assaulted a 22-year-old woman that morning. Residents had heard the man held the woman at gunpoint and assaulted her near 56th Street and Lansdowne Avenue, police told The Philadelphia Inquirer.

This is the second recent vigilante action in the city, the newspaper said. Police said residents of the Kensington neighborhood beat _____, 26, a suspect in the June rape of an 11-year-old girl who was on her way to school.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


MI - 10 Arrested in Sex Predator Sting

View the article here
Man Arrested in Predator Sting Speaks Out
Correction - 9 were arrested

My question is, why do the police need vigilante drop outs like Perverted-Justice to help in these stings? Why can't they do it? I think it's all for "entertainment" purposes, that is why! Also, see this item as well, for further questions on these stings!

08/17/2009

HOWELL (WXYZ) - In a major Action News Exclusive, police call them predators, they drive for miles, just to have sex with children in our area, but tonight they are busted, locked up in jail after an undercover sting.

Only one reporter was allowed to be inside that sting, Action News Investigator Heather Catallo.

Heather:
I’m at the Livingston County Sheriff’s dept where these accused sexual predators are now locked up. Ten men traveled from places like Monroe County, Grand Rapids, one man even hopped a bus from Ohio, all hoping to have sex with a young teenager.

Officers:
"That’s him right there!"
"I think that’s our guy."

They think they are meeting up with a young girl or young boy for sex. Instead these accused predators are greeted by armed sheriff’s deputies.

In a house wired with hidden cameras, investigators from the Michigan Attorney General's office and Livingston County Sheriff's deputies teamed up with the non-profit group Perverted Justice for a 3 day sting operation.

"We’re watching too, if he comes back online, then we’ll know that he’s playing us."

The Action News Investigators were granted exclusive access to the sting, which started Friday afternoon.

"He’s checking us out pretty hard."

For weeks dozens of decoys from Perverted Justice have been chatting online with about 150 predators, all of them thought they were talking to a young teenage boy or girl from southeast Michigan.

Dennis Ker/Perverted Justice:
"Of those 150, there’s a subset of 50 that have actually gone to the point of setting up a meeting, talked about sex, wanted to have sex, and know the age of the child, and know what they’re doing."

Every car that rolls down the street is scrutinized.

"This is a slow roll – slow roll."

But this suspect approaches the sting house on foot.

"That’s the guy who was supposed to take a cab. He might have had the cab drop him off up the road. That’s him! That’s him!"

His screen name is Hel_Bomber, and he thinks he’s meeting up with 14-year-old Samantha. His real name is _____, and this 40-year-old from Clawson has already told the decoy on-line: "i wanna have sex with you."

"And he’s the guy who’s supposed to be bringing 2 videos, and he had 2 in his hand."

_____ never actually came to the door, but after checking out the webcam shot he sent the decoy – the investigators from the Attorney General’s office send in the deputies to snag him.

"Just see if you can find him."

After arresting _____, deputies seized the 2 movies he’d brought along, as well as the receipt showing that this grocery store clerk spent $110 on cab fare to get to the sting house.

Del Harvey/Perverted Justice:
"Well, I guess he’s been pretty up front with his intent."

A very explicit late night chat on Craig’s list drums up this guy: 37-year-old _____.

Decoy Del Harvey prepares herself to look like the 14-year-old boy _____ is expecting. But at the last minute, this party DJ from Eastpointe decides he doesn’t want to meet at the house.

"He wants to meet at McDonalds. Let’s go."

The deputies arrest him in the restaurant parking lot.

Heather/On Camera:
"_____, why did you want to do this tonight?"

So _____’s 2 a.m. rendezvous will actually be in the Livingston County Jail.

Heather/On Camera:
"Why did you want to have sex with a young child?"

On Saturday afternoon a 49-year-old security guard and grandfather drives 72 miles ...

"That’s him right there!"

… from Monroe County to meet up with what he thought was a 14-year-old girl.

"Ok, Del, we’re off the phone with him. He’s coming out of the door!"

Del the decoy waves _____ into the house and the deputies take him down.

_____/Arrested in Predator Sting:
"I didn’t mean to do this guys, please!"

_____ says he used to be a military police officer.

_____/Arrested in Predator Sting:
"I didn’t touch nothing, I don’t want to be on the predators list, I’m a security officer."

Now he’s in custody, along with 29-year-old _____, who traveled all the way from Columbus, Ohio by bus and cab – hoping to have sex with a 13-year-old girl.

In his online chat, this software engineer told the decoy, "don’t say anything about me to ur mother becoz u r under 18."

He gets to the front door of the sting house and then gets busted.

The Attorney General's investigators also nabbed 53-year-old _____.

Later the deputies arrested 47-year-old _____ from Grand Rapids. Officials say he was caught at a nearby McDonalds hoping to have sex with a 14-year-old boy.

John Sellek:
"Our #1 goal, is to get as many people offline, and frankly into a prison cell as we can."

Heather:
All 10 men have been charged with several felonies, including child sexually abusive activity and computer crimes.

Coming up after the jump, Heather sits face-to-face with one of these accused predators. You’ll hear why he was so driven to approach a child for sex.
- See the second link at the top, for this interview (the video is below). Also, see this article which Del Harvey says:

Del (Harvey)

"For instance, I'll pick up a phone and hear (without turning it on) a dial tone and then a woman's voice speaking. Or I can hear someone using that pressurized air stuff and I'll feel it on my forearms."

"Lots of stuff like that. But, like I said, the anti-psychotic drugs usually keep that to a minimum."

Video Link


Video Link


Dennis Kerr from Perverted-Justice gets PUNKED on live radio
Video Link



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


SD - Changes To Sex Offender Registry Considered

View the article here
See Also

All ex-sex offenders and their families, living in this state, need to attend this meeting, and let your voice be heard!

08/14/2009

By Ben Dunsmoor

For several years South Dakota lawmakers have been cracking down on registered sex offenders, passing tougher rules and regulations for the convicted criminals to follow. But a legislative committee is now looking at easing up on certain types of sex offenders.

If you have to register as a sex offender in South Dakota, your name, picture, and address will be part of the registry for the rest of your life. But lawmakers are looking at making exceptions, and letting some sex offenders take their names off the registry.

For the last three years looking up the registered sex offenders in South Dakota has been as easy as logging on to the internet.

"I would say that South Dakota has some of the toughest sex offender laws in the nation," South Dakota Republican Senator Gene Abdallah of Sioux Falls said.
- Every single state out there says this!

But, a seven member legislative committee is looking to see if South Dakota's sex offender registry is too tough.

"We're looking at the possibility of making exceptions to get off the list after a certain period of time depending on the seriousness of the offense," Abdallah said.

Senator Gene Abdallah is the chairman of the committee looking at the changes. Abdallah says some of the offenders on the sex offender registry don't deserve to be on it their entire life.

"We've had examples of 16 and 18 year olds dating, and he's considered an adult at 18, and she's not, and something happens and he gets on the sex offender registry and is on there for life," Abdallah said.

Abdallah doesn't want to call it weakening the laws, he says he is still in favor of keeping some of the most serious offenders on the registry for life.

"I'm not in favor of weakening or diluting any laws when it comes to sex offenders or crime for that matter, but I do feel we should be fair," Abdallah said.

Being fair to some of those that are serving an online life sentence, on the sex offender registry.

The committee studying South Dakota's sex offender registry will meet Tuesday in Pierre and take testimony from the South Dakota Attorney General, prosecutors, and defense attorneys, as well as input from the public.

Abdallah hopes to have a bill written for the entire legislature to consider by December.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved