Friday, August 7, 2009

MI - Kuipers wants sex offender answers

A state senator (Email) wants to know why paroled sex offenders are living in state-paid motels.

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"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


How young is too young to be labeled a sex offender?

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"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


UK - Acquitted Man Says Virus Put Pornography on Computer

View the article here

Old, but still relevant. He apparently lost his daughter as well, see here.

08/11/2003

By JOHN SCHWARTZ

When Mr. Green checked the machine, he found that the family PC seemed almost possessed. The Internet home page had somehow been switched so that the computer displayed a child pornography site when the browser software started up. Even if he turned the machine off, it would turn itself back on and dial the Internet on its own.

Mr. Green called the computer maker and followed instructions to return his PC to a G-rated state. The pornography went away, but the computer still often crashed and kept connecting to the Internet even when "there was no one in the blinking house," he said.

But Mr. Green's problems were only beginning. Last October, local police knocked on his door, searched his home and seized his computer. They found no sign of pornography in his home but discovered 172 images of child pornography on the computer's hard drive. They arrested Mr. Green.

This month, Mr. Green was acquitted in Exeter Crown Court after arguing that the material had been gathered without his knowledge by a rogue program created by hackers - a so-called Trojan horse - that had infected his PC, probably during innocent Internet surfing. Mr. Green, 45, is one of the first people to use this defense successfully.

While a case that played out in the British legal system sets no precedent in the United States, legal experts say the technical issues raise two troubling possibilities. For one, actual child pornographers could arm themselves with a new alibi that would be difficult to disprove. Or, unknowing Web surfers could find themselves charged with possessing illegal material that a lurking software program has acquired.

"The scary thing is not that the defense might work," said Mark Rasch, a former federal computer crime prosecutor. "The scary thing is that the defense might be right," and that hijacked computers could be turned to an evil purpose without an owner's knowledge or consent.

"The nightmare scenario," Mr. Rasch said, "is somebody might go to jail for something he didn't do because he was set up."

Mr. Green was eventually exonerated, but his life has been turned upside down by the accusations. His ex-wife went to court soon after his arrest and gained custody of their youngest child and his house. Mr. Green, who is disabled because of a degenerative disk disease, spent nine days in prison and three months in a "bail hostel," or halfway house, and was allowed only supervised visits with his daughter.

"There's some little sicko out there who's doing this," Mr. Green said, "and he's ruined my life. I've got to fight to get everything back."

He said he had no clue how the rogue software showed up on his computer. "I never download anything. and as far as I knew, no others had," he said.

When his solicitor, Chris Bittlestone, hired a computer security consultant to examine the PC, nearly a dozen Trojan horse programs showed up on the hard drive. "When the report came in, it was very much what you would call a eureka moment," Mr. Bittlestone said. But Mr. Green took the news differently.

"He was very quiet and said, `See? I told you,' " Mr. Bittlestone recalled.

Tony Dearsley, the computer investigations manager for Vogon International Ltd., the company that examined the machine, says Trojan horse programs are increasingly common.

"Any Web site could contain this sort of thing," he said. "The reputable ones don't. The less reputable ones may." Anyone using the computer who visits sites offering legal adult fare, gambling or even a music file-swapping site might pick up malicious software, he said.

Mr. Green, who now lives with his son and his 83-year-old mother in the nearby town of Paignton, said that it was possible that some member of his family had accidentally infected the computer in that way. "I know my son had a look at some iffy sites," he said. "He's a teenager."

Antivirus software and programs like Ad-Aware can ferret out and disable Trojans, but they must be kept up to date to be effective in a fast-changing field. Mr. Green said that he had antivirus software on his computer, but that it was outdated.

The police would not disclose the source of the original tip in the case, but Mr. Green noted that the raid came two weeks after he had won custody of his daughter in court. Mr. Bittlestone would not comment directly on the matter. "Calls may well have been made," he said. "I'm not quite sure what the dynamics were within the family at that time."

Mr. Bittlestone said that he was troubled that prosecutors did not mention the Trojan programs after his client's arrest: "Either the police didn't spot this issue, or if they did spot it they chose not to pursue it." Mr. Green, he said, is now considering a lawsuit against the police.

Calls to the local police in Mr. Green's area were referred late on Friday to the pedophile unit at Ashburton, which could not be reached. But the prosecutor in the case, David Sapieca, told the BBC: "We don't accept the conclusions of the defense expert report, but there were already other issues in the case regarding the history of the computer itself. We cannot show that Mr. Green downloaded the images on to the computer, so the Crown reluctantly offer no evidence in this case."

Mr. Green's case could point the way to a new defense in courts in the United States, said Andrew Grosso, a lawyer and former federal prosecutor in Washington. The presence of a Trojan could mean that the computer is "not entirely under your control," he said, and a defendant could "legitimately point a finger elsewhere."

A senior official at the Department of Justice said that the defense, while novel, might not hold up in court. "There are ways to look at the evidence to see if something like this - even if it is present - is responsible for the conduct at issue," the official said. Thus a prosecutor would scan the computer to make sure that it did, in fact, have rogue software, and would try to determine whether the software could do what the defendant claimed that it did.

In a child pornography case, he said, investigators would also try to discover other corroborating evidence, like Internet communications with known pedophiles, or a stack of child pornography in the suspect's home.

Mr. Bittlestone said: "You will only be able to use this defense if you can show that Trojan horse viruses have infected" a computer. If not, he said, "You have to account for your actions."

Mr. Green said that despite the disruption in his life, things could have been much worse: he could have spent years in prison, lost all visitation rights to see his daughter, and could have been entered into lists of sex offenders. "There would have been no point to living after that," he said. "Everything is just taken away from you."

But he said he had no sympathy for pedophiles and users of child pornography, many of whom he met in the bail hostel. He called them "nasty little people," and said, "Whatever they do to them isn't enough."

Things are beginning to turn around for him since the British press has written about his acquittal, he said. One of the parents from his daughter's school, who hadn't spoken to him since the arrest, began talking to him the other day.

"She must have said, `Perhaps he's not a pervert after all,' " Mr. Green said.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


ME - Sex Offender Sues State, District Attorney

View the article here

08/07/2009

By Amy Erickson

A convicted sex offender from Steuben is suing the State and a District Attorney, claiming they violated his rights.

Hancock and Washington County District Attorney Michael Povich and Maine State Police Chief Patrick Fleming are both named in the suit brought by _____.

He was convicted of four counts of sexual abuse of a minor back in 1999.

_____ claims that because he was required to register as a sex offender, his right to privacy was violated.

_____ says he would not have pleaded guilty had he known he'd be required to register for ten years.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


NY - Former Judge Going to Prison

View the article here

08/07/2009

By Maria Sisti

A former judge, who had a reputation for handing out tough sentences, stood on the other side of the bench Friday to hear his fate after pleading guilty to transporting women across state lines for the purposes of prostitution.

74 year old Ronald Tills, formerly a State Supreme Court Justice, was sentenced to 18 months in federal prison in U.S. District Court in Buffalo before Judge William Skretny. He was also fined $25,000. There were numerous family members, friends, and supporters in the courtroom and some cried as the judge announced the prison term.
- So what about being on the sex offender registry for life, and to live by the residency restrictions?  This was a sex crime!

Before the sentencing Tills told Skretny in court that he was "embarassed and remorseful for the disgrace" he caused to the judicial system and his family. He also regretted the harm he caused and prayed for forgiveness from his victims. They were identified by the judge as women who were undocumented illegal aliens forced to work as prostitutes. Skretny also pointed out that one of the women was actually a defendant in Tills' court when he was a judge and he began a relationship with her.

Federal investigators say the discovery of Tills' behavior began with arrests at massage parlors in Western New York. Tills had ties to the Royal Order of Jesters, a men's organization that prosecutors say often arranged for women to have sex with club members. Skretny noted that Tills has cooperated with federal investigators in the ongoing case probing prosititution and trafficking of women.

A former police captain and Tills' former court clerk were sentenced earlier this year for their involvement in the case.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


FL - Unlike Florida, Iowa reworked sex offender law

View the article here

07/23/2009

By Julie Brown

Midwestern state's new law superseded local ordinances and eased residency requirements for minor sex offenders

MIAMI - A flock of sex offenders camping out in alleys, sleeping under bridges and hiding in places where police can't keep track of them.

A patchwork of inconsistent city, township and county laws carving out zones where sex offenders are not welcome.

And squeamish elected officials petrified that if they try to brew a fix their next attack ad will be a snapshot of them with their arms around a sex predator.

Sound familiar? It may all seem like Miami-Dade's quandary over what to do with the sex offenders living under the Julia Tuttle Causeway -- but it's not.

Iowa officials faced nearly the same issues, but in April settled things by doing something Florida hasn't found the political will to do -- change its sexual predator law.

This past spring, Iowa's state legislature -- with almost no dissent -- passed a new sex offender law that superseded local ordinances and eased residency requirements for minor sex offenders.

The law ended the ban against some sex offenders living within 2,000 feet of a school or day care center and created other zones where they are prohibited from lingering, visiting or working.

The new statute is less confusing, and while it's not perfect, it has been lauded by law enforcement, victims' rights advocates, the ACLU, prosecutors and legislators as a positive step.

Iowa offers a roadmap for Florida to break its political stalemate over how to deal with convicted sex offenders who have left prison.

The story in Iowa began in 2005 when the state legislature passed into law a strict measure prohibiting all sex offenders from living within 2,000 feet of a school or day care. But it became problematic almost from the start.

Like Florida's law, it was written so broadly that even those who only gave a pornographic magazine to a minor were considered as dangerous as someone who raped a 9-year-old. In Iowa, both were classified as sex offenders and had to register and live outside the 2,000-foot zone. (Florida's law is 1,000 feet)

"We were just about the first state in the nation to pass a sex offender law," recalled Randall Wilson, legal director for Iowa's ACLU (Contact). "It sounded good on paper to a lot of politicians. But after several years, everyone realized we made a terrible mistake."

Iowa State Sen. Jerry Behn (Email) recalled that legislators were nervous about changing the law at time of media frenzy over child abductions and deadly sex crimes against children.

"Nobody wants a flier saying you are going soft on sex predators," Behn said.

But law enforcement prevailed by pointing out the problems with the law.

Police had a tough time enforcing it for several reasons: with no place to live, sexual offenders often absconded, police spent too much time trying to find them and when they did find them, couldn't register them because they had no residence.

Like South Florida, Des Moines had its share of sex offenders living under bridges, in alleys and on the streets.

William Melville, president of the Iowa Association of Chiefs of Police and Peace Officers and Sioux City police sergeant, said at one point the city had a map with all the exclusionary zones circled on it.

"Someone would come up to us and ask 'Where's this little white area where I can go?'"

How did Iowa do it?

Legislators were prodded by some powerful forces -- all of whom lobbied hard for change.

With an election year on the horizon in 2010, the jittery lawmakers formed a committee that met in secret and crafted a law they felt the entire legislature -- and the public -- could live with.

Among other things, the law created three tiers whereby those who committed very minor sex crimes would be permitted to live near a school or other places where children congregate. The very worst sex offenders still must adhere to the 2,000-foot ban and other strict rules.

"The law enforcement community was pretty united," said Ross Loder, of the Iowa Department of Public Safety. "We are not nearly concerned about where the sex offender sleeps; we are really concerned about what they do when they are awake."

That kind of debate is not happening in Florida, where local and state government leaders continue pointing fingers at each other and penning lawsuits to find an answer.

Meanwhile, the Florida legislature has almost ignored the issue, with Gov. Charlie Crist (Contact) refusing to step in, saying it's a local matter.

Democratic state Sen. Dan Gelber (Email), whose district includes the Julia Tuttle Causeway and is campaigning for state attorney general, agrees that something needs to be done, but says a lot more thoughtful policy must go into it.

"Florida has much more different challenges than Iowa," Gelber said. "What we're not going to do is have statewide lower standards and open our neighborhoods because some professor says it's OK."

Gelber firmly believes that sex offenders are likely to continue to commit sex crimes. He favors some of the proposals being hammered out by Ron Book, chairman of Miami-Dade's Homeless Trust. Book is trying to find housing alternatives for the homeless sex offenders now living under the causeway.

Book said Thursday that they are looking at several properties in South Miami, as well as the old North Dade Detention Center, where staff offices had previously been converted into living quarters.

He conceded however, that moving them is not the solution. "We don't need a Band-aid; we need a longer-term solution. As more and more of these sexual predators exit the correctional system and there's less and space, what do you do with the population?"

But Lode, of the Iowa Department of Public Safety, warns that the further people marginalize sexual predators, the more isolated they become from society -- and the more likely they are to re-commit crimes.

Said Lode: "It takes political courage to step up and enact changes."


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


2009 National Symposium on Sex Offender Management and Accountability



August 2009

The SMART Office held its 2009 National Symposium on Sex Offender Management and Accountability in Houston, Texas, April 21–23. More than 600 registry officials, law enforcement personnel, tribal representatives, prosecutors, and practitioners attended, receiving information and tools to enable them to more effectively monitor, register, track, and manage sex offenders.

SMART's annual symposium included the National Workshop on the Adam Walsh Act, at which officials from most SORNA registry jurisdictions received an overview of the resources and assistance available from the SMART Office. The symposium included presentations about the Comprehensive Approaches to Sex Offender Management grant program, the Dru Sjodin National Sex Offender Public Website, and the Tribe and Territory Sex Offender Registry System. Attendees also learned about issues involving international and interjurisdictional tracking of sex offenders, including the efforts of INTERPOL, ICE's Operation Angel Watch, and the Adam Walsh Act-mandated International Tracking of Sex Offenders Working Group.

The symposium included concurrent sessions spread across three tracks:

  • Enforcement featured sessions on handling and registering compliant and noncompliant adult and juvenile sex offenders.
  • Indian Country highlighted methods and resources for states and tribes to use in developing cooperative agreements and demonstrated the Model Tribal Code for managing and tracking sex offenders in Indian Country.
  • Policy covered the efforts of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies to track sex offenders and recent developments in sex offender registry case law, legislation, and research.

We have already begun planning the 2010 symposium and are working to ensure that it will echo the success of this year's event. Check back soon for information on the 2010 symposium.

Other Newsletters: (Source)



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


TX - Judge scolds parole officials over sex offender classification

View the article here

So this brings up this question, "How many on the sex offender registries, are there due to something mentioned in this article, who have never been convicted of any sex crime?  How bloated is the registries?"

08/07/2009

By Mike Ward

Sam Sparks stops trial after attorneys object to comments he made to jury about witness' testimony.

A federal judge on Thursday issued a stern rebuke to state corrections officials for the way they classify some parolees as sex offenders even though the defendants have never been convicted of sex crimes.

U.S. District Judge Sam Sparks also voiced frustration with state parole officials for ignoring earlier court decisions and a previous directive by him and ordered the state Board of Pardons and Paroles to review whether to leave parolee _____ on sex offender restrictions.

"It's time for the parole division and the Board of Pardons and Paroles to stop being defensive and start trying not to use technical defenses," Sparks said, in ruling that the restrictions were not imposed on _____ legally and that parole officials ignored a subsequent court warning about the deficiency.

"The undisputed evidence established no official involved in the ... process has ever made the necessary finding that Mr. _____ constituted a threat to society by his lack of sexual control."

Sparks also declared a mistrial in the case after a week of testimony when attorneys for the state objected to comments he made to the jury about a witness' testimony.

_____ filed suit against parole officials after they officially listed him as a sex offender in December 2007 — without allowing him to see the results of a psychiatric evaluation they ordered him to undergo or to appear with his attorneys at a hearing at which the decision was made. _____, who served time in prison for burglary and attempted murder, was never convicted of a sex crime. He was arrested for aggravated rape in 1982, but was never convicted.

In January 2008, Sparks warned the parole board that he had serious concerns about their policy on imposing restrictions on some parolees. For _____, that meant requiring him to undergo sex-abuse therapy and barring him from becoming a minister and going to church, among other things.

In a parole system known for its secrecy — decisions are usually made behind closed doors, and most parole files are not public record — Thursday's development marked a rare crack in that armor, although not the first. In three other cases in two years, Austin federal judges have questioned the legality of the state's policy by which restrictions are placed on parolees. Across Texas, parole officials said, more than a dozen other lawsuits on the issue are pending.

"I think this case displays the arrogance of power that permeates the parole board," said Bill Habern, one of _____'s attorneys.

That view is strongly disputed by parole officials, who insist they are following the law as they interpret it.

Sparks stopped the trial Thursday morning after he contradicted a parole board witness on her testimony about federal court decisions.

After former parole board general counsel Laura McElroy testified that federal court decisions allowed the state's policy, Sparks had told jurors: "The lady is wrong ... the lady is wrong ... (McElroy) is stating issues of the law that are just wrong."

Assistant attorneys general representing the state complained that the judge's remarks might have prejudiced the six-member jury against Parole Board Chairwoman Rissie Owens and state parole director Stuart Jenkins.

"I was out of bounds," Sparks said of his remarks. But he also told parole officials they will have to answer for their actions in not giving _____ a hearing before they imposed the conditions.

While the case involved only _____, Sparks said he believes the parole board has illegally placed restrictions on perhaps thousands of parolees who have been classified as sex offenders.

"I don't believe the Board of Pardons and Paroles can justify the imposition (of the condition) on any parolee," Sparks said, citing wording in the current policy that says the condition can be attached if an offender "could" pose a public safety threat.

"Everyone in this room is a possible risk to the public, including this federal judge," Sparks said, noting that restrictions had been placed on _____ even though the parole board never had made that finding in his case. "Actually, that's more troubling to the court than this individual case."

Until June, parole officials routinely refused to give offenders a copy of psychiatric evaluations and other documents and to provide face-to-face hearings. That policy was changed after _____'s case appeared headed to trial.

In testimony, parole officials said they specifically made the new policy retroactive to cover _____ and about 650 others without sex-crime convictions who have been placed under sex-offender rules.

Parole officials repeatedly insisted the state policies are legal — even though Sparks in January 2008 strongly hinted they were unconstitutional and ordered copies of his order delivered to state parole officials. Several testified they had either never received it or not read it.

Parole officials also said there was no legal requirement for a "live" hearing. To provide offenders hearings, they said, could cost more than $1.7 million a year for additional staff.

Parole officials and a spokesman for the attorney general declined to comment on the case.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


FL - Picture Depicts Kids Present At Sex Offender Camp

View the article here

Leave it up to the fear mongering media to possibly blow stuff out of proportion. Hey people, even sex offenders have family and kids, and these kids were probably visiting, along with the significant other, which is not a crime, like the media portrays it out to be. Most offenders can be around their own kids, with an adults permission. Just the typical fear-mongering propaganda to force the offenders from under the bridge. Why did they not interview the offender(s) who had kids there? Probably because it would expose them for the fear-mongers they actually are?

08/06/2009

By Michael Williams

MIAMI (CBS4) - There are fresh worries and renewed anger about the camp under and around the Julia Tuttle Causeway--one populated by more than 70 sexual offenders--after a new picture was revealed at a commission meeting Thursday.

Miami's code enforcement board showed pictures of children playing under the causeway at their city hall meeting Wednesday night. There was worry the children were living with relatives in the squalid camp, but those concerns appear to be unfounded.

Miami Code Enforcement director Mariano Loret de Mola says his inspector spoke with a man accompanying the two boys he caught on camera. The man explained why they were in the camp.

"He says well these children have an uncle that lives over here and that's why they're over here with us," said Loret de Mola.

Other children have been spotted playing inside the camp, and one child may have spent the night last week. Department of Corrections officials say they received a report that one of the sex offenders living in the camp had his wife and son sleep in a vehicle with him near dozens of other sex offenders.

That is not a violation of that man's probation, but hearing children are in the camp at all, has Corrections officials worried.

"Considering the population under the Julia Tuttle Causeway, it's never good for children to be around there," said Corrections spokeswoman Gretl Plessinger.

What's more, Plessinger said Code Enforcement Inspectors never informed them the two boys depicted in the inspector's pictures were in the camp.

They did not learn of the visit until CBS4 Reporter Natalia Zea called them.

Plessinger said, "I would hope that the person who saw this would contact either a probation officer or police and report the situation…. I appreciate CBS4 though letting us know about this situation."

Still, its cause for louder outcry that the state do something about offenders it is supposed to supervise upon their release from prison—something more, that is, than let them set up camp on Biscayne Bay.

Miami commissioner Marc Sarnoff said, "It is an abject failure of the State of Florida to continue to have sex offenders under the bridge."

The failure has blame being spread in many directions. That includes the critics of the Miami-Dade ordinance that say sexual offenders and predators must stay at least 2,500 feet away from any place where children congregate, including schools, parks, and daycare facilities. The state rule requires offenders to stay at least 1,000 feet away from such places.

The critics argue local restrictions make it doubly tough for sexual offenders who have served their time to find a place to live. The Miami-Dade Homeless Trust chairman, Ron Book, keeps pressing for an answer but a lot of help is not forthcoming, at least not yet.

Book says that whatever one's view of the people under the Tuttle causeway, it is not serving community safety to have them living there. What's more, he worries about legal action to force them out, without first making sure there is housing available somewhere. Book says, "Having 71 offenders running around the community without knowing where they are is a worse solution."

The frustrations keep growing and the national—indeed international—coverage keeps building. It is not a pretty picture, but from the governor's office to local government halls, no one has stepped up yet to embrace a solution.




"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved


Apple pulls another popular application from the App Store

View the article here

Good, this would've put more offenders and their families in possible danger. The states need to only allow certain people access to their databases, not everyone looking to make a quick buck.

08/06/2009

You may have read about a popular two dollar dictionary called Ninjawords being pulled yesterday from the App Store over objectionable content. You also may have read the article last week about the application that locates sex offenders in a neighborhood on your iPhone.

Well, according to Tech Crunch, Offender Locator has been in the top 10 paid applications in the last several weeks yet has now been completely removed from the App Store without a trace. If you aren’t familiar with what it does, it basically showed, using little red balloons, where sex offenders in your selected area live.

That probably wasn’t part of the problem though.

There is speculation that because Offender Locater had a price, it could be violating California law.

Why?

Well according to some Tech Crunch readers, selling people’s information for profit is illegal. However, the information used within the program is public, so that doesn't make a lot of sense. While this has not been announced as the reason the application was pulled.
- If this is the case, then what is to stop the average Joe from printing up the registry, and selling it to people in their neighborhood to make a quick buck?

Authorities also might have pressured Apple to pull it out of fear of vigilantes going after sex offenders.

But again, the flaws in the App Store are brought to the surface once again. Is there a screening process at all? There are quite a few applications that have come out lately that are pretty subjective in their purpose, but one that could possibly be violating a state law should never get passed.

The developers of Offender Locator also might sue Apple, so we’ll see how this plays out.



Here is another called "Watch Out!"


And another called "StaySafe" which charges $15



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues, All Rights Reserved