Friday, July 24, 2009

CA - Sex offender slips off monitoring device, skips

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Just goes to show you, GPS is a waste of time, money and resources.

07/24/2009

A registered sex offender remains at large after he removed a monitoring device two years ago and stopped contacting his parole agent, officials said.

_____, 50, is now wanted for being a non-compliant sex offender, according to the Riverside County District Attorney's Office.

He was identified as this week's Riverside County Most Wanted fugitive.

_____ was charged with rape in Palm Springs in January 2003.

He was convicted of sexual battery charges and sentenced to four years in prison.

Upon his release, officials said, he registered as a sex offender and wore a monitoring device strapped to his ankle.

In August 2007, however, he removed the device and fled, officials said.

_____ has not complied with any of his registration requirements as a sex offender, according to the district attorney's office.

He remains at large.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)


OFF TOPIC - IL - Woman Beaten by Tazewell County Jailers

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Cops these days are just out of control. I don't care what this lady did, they could've grabbed her, then handcuffed her to a bench or something, this is beyond extreme to me. They slammed her head up against the wall. And these cops are apparently keeping their jobs. They beat the hell out of this lady! Say Hello to the new Gestapo!


07/23/2009

PEKIN – Three Tazewell County jailers accused of using excessive force against a female inmate last fall have been absolved of the administrative charges against them and ordered reinstated with back pay.

But Tazewell County Sheriff Bob Huston said Tuesday that he will fight that ruling in circuit court in an attempt to have correctional officers Jeffrey Bieber and Justin Piro and Sgt. Richard Johnston permanently removed from their positions at the jail.

All three have been on administrative leave since October, when Becky Behm was brought to the jail after her arrest on drunken driving charges in Creve Coeur shortly after midnight Oct. 17.

By 5:30 a.m., she had been swung into a concrete wall head-first by Piro, punched in the face by Bieber and pepper sprayed on Johnston’s order.

The incidents have been the subject of hearings before the Tazewell County Sheriff’s Merit Commission since late last year, though those hearings didn’t begin in earnest until May. Huston wanted the commission to allow him to terminate the jailers.

Attorneys for the officers were scheduled to begin presenting evidence for their clients Tuesday morning, but instead asked the commission to make a direct finding of not guilty and reinstate the jailers to their jobs with back pay.

The commission unanimously agreed.

I felt after the prosecution was done that they didn’t prove their case – any of it,” commissioner Harvey Richmond said. “We all felt – what we saw in (the video), she would not do anything that they told her – they used only the minimal force that was needed to control her.”

Richmond, a former deputy, said the commission didn’t need to hear testimony presented by the officers’ attorneys to find them innocent of the charges leveled against them by the sheriff because of Behm’s behavior.

If she at any time would have complied, she would have been out of there in half an hour,” Richmond said. “If I would have seen something that I think was way out of line with the situation, I would have gone the other way, but I didn’t see it.”

Richmond said the 30-minute portion of the video shown during Behm’s testimony in May needed to be examined very closely and in the context of the several hours before that footage to better understand the situation officers were trying to control.

But Huston maintained Tuesday that the 30-minute segment, which he released to media outlets after the ruling, was enough to justify the officers’ termination. In the first couple of days after the incident, he called it the worst case of unnecessary force he’d seen in a decade as sheriff.

I can not understand how anyone can watch the video of that incident and just let them all go,” Huston said after the ruling Tuesday. “I believe that officers should be held to a high standard of conduct, but not to impossible or unattainable standards. Today, the merit commission refused to hold them to even the lowest standards of conduct or even to basic human dignity.”

Attorneys for the jailers couldn’t immediately be reached for comment later Tuesday.

Behm, who testified before the commission in May, said she couldn’t recall most of the night at the jail and had no specific recollection of the beatings in a segregation cell in the A-block of the jail.

She said she had drank four or five beers at Behmer’s Dugout, the Peoria bar she owns, over the course of about five hours before her arrest by a Creve Coeur police sergeant on suspicion of drunken driving.

Piro and Bieber claimed in their testimony before the commission that Behm was extremely intoxicated and belligerent and had to be transferred to the segregation cell to maintain order in the usual holding area.

Piro eventually swung Behm head-first into a concrete wall but testified that he was attempting to execute a sanctioned “takedown” technique and lost his balance. Bieber punched Behm in the face, but he claimed she attempted to leave the cell and lunged at him.

The merit commission’s rejection of Huston’s charges is the second such outcome for a high-profile Tazewell County case. The commission in December vetoed Huston’s request to fire Deputy Jeff Bass for neglecting his duties and intimidating his superiors, though Bass was found guilty of those offenses.

Huston said he will appeal Tuesday’s decision because he believes he was denied a fair hearing and the result was contrary to the evidence.

Citation added: Buedel, Matt. “Tazewell jailers cleared in beating case – Peoria, IL – pjstar.com.” Home – Peoria, IL – pjstar.com. 21 July 2009. Web. 23 July 2009.

This has happened in our own backyard! Folks, if we don’t speak up NOW but rather just accept this, you too can expect to be treated this way eventually. It should be mentioned that this woman is a business owner.

There was an investigation. That’s why we are just now seeing the video. Those jailers were under administrative leave the whole time. They have just been reinstated and have been rewarded their entire back pay!

In addition to those officers being fired and hopefully brought up on felony charges for battery and mob action, we must also look at the JUDGE who ruled in FAVOR of these disgusting excuses for men who committed a felony when they mercilessly beat the hell out of this woman for no good reason!

This is going to require a call to action among the citizens of this community. Campaign for Liberty will be proud to lead it.

The names of the officers who committed this crime are Jeffrey Bieber and Justin Piro.




"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)


MS - Court rejects state banishment of sex offender

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07/23/2009

The state Court of Appeals has thrown out a lower court order that a McComb man be banished from Mississippi once he completes a 25-year sentence for a sex crime conviction.

_____ pleaded guilty in 2004 in Pike County to spying on and assaulting nursing home residents. _____ pleaded guilty to attempted burglary, two counts voyeurism, sexual battery, sexual abuse of a vulnerable adult and burglary of a dwelling.

Prosecutors said _____ broke into the room of a 76-year-old woman at McComb Extended Care on March 4, 2004, and assaulted her. Three weeks later, authorities said he tried to break into a female resident's room at another home, spied on the woman, then spied on two female residents at McComb Nursing and Rehab.

The trial judge sentenced _____ to a total of 30 years without parole with five years suspended. The judge also ordered _____ to leave Mississippi once he is released from prison.
- You can't tell someone to leave the state!

In a post-conviction petition, _____ contended his pleas were not voluntary, that his attorney could have done a better job and banishment was too harsh, among other issues.

In a post-conviction petition, an inmate argues he has found new evidence - or a possible constitutional issue - that could persuade a court to order a new trial.

The Appeals Court on Tuesday rejected all of _____'s claims but agreed banishment was too cruel. _____ could ask the Mississippi Supreme Court to hear his appeal.

On the issue of banishment, the Appeals Court said _____ consisted to it as part of the sentencing agreement with prosecutors.

Nonetheless, Appeals Judge Jimmy Maxwell said the "practice of dumping defendants on other jurisdictions has been held improper by the Mississippi Supreme Court and federal courts on public policy grounds."

Maxwell said banishment has been upheld where the trial court found, among other things, that it did not hinder rehabilitation and could be shown as in the best interests of the defendant and the public.

"While banishing _____ from Mississippi would perhaps provide a degree of protection to the citizens of our state, we certainly do not want our sister states repaying us for the favor," Maxwell said.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)


OH - Sex offender reclass suits taxing courts

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You reap what you sow!

07/23/2009

By LINDA MARTZ

MANSFIELD — Many of the 200-plus sex offenders who appealed their reclassifications through Richland County courts committed their offenses elsewhere.

Richland County prosecutor’s office staffers said that has put a burden on local resources.

Mansfield’s two prisons, two halfway houses and sex offender treatment facility triggered an onslaught of Adam Walsh Act reclassification cases filed here.

Quite frankly, I take some of these (case files) home, along with the work from my private practice,” attorney Frank Ardis said.

Ordinarily, Ardis works for the prosecutor’s office part-time, offering legal advice to commissioners and other county agencies. Assistant Prosecutor Kirsten Pscholka-Gartner usually handles criminal appeals, but a caseload spike necessitated bringing in Ardis.

Sex offenders unhappy with their reclassification by the Ohio Attorney General can challenge their status in common pleas courts.

I think there’s close to 200 (here),” Ardis said.

Starting around fall 2008, Richland County judges issued a series of rulings saying retroactive classification is unconstitutional. The prosecutor’s office appealed to the Fifth District Court of Appeals. Now appeals rulings — overturning local judges’ decisions — are making their way to Richland County.

As of this week, the appeals court returned 35 reclassification opinions across its 15-county district — 29 to Richland County. Only seven of those cases involved people convicted here.

So if he is sent to Mansfield prison (or treatment center), he can file it in Richland County,” she said.

Fifth District Court of Appeals Administrator Melinda Cooper said Richland County sex offenders are allowed to file their objections in the county where they “reside.” Richland is the only county in the Fifth District with state prisons.

The result?

The clerk’s office last year processed 337 appeals — “a big increase for us. We generally have 115 to 125 cases a year,” Richland County Clerk of Courts Lin Frary said.

The Fifth District rulings mean common pleas court hearings determine reclassification. Ardis estimates hearings take 20 minutes to two hours.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)


ID - Programs used to help rehabilitate sex offenders

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See this about the so called "1 in 5" number

07/23/2009

By Kiersten Throndsen

ADA COUNTY - Sean Hale is classified as a Violent Sexual Predator but police say that didn't stop Sean Hale from committing another sex crime involving two teens from Meridian.

Three years ago _____ registered as a Violent Sexual Predator in Ada County.

"He is a flight risk and a risk to the community," an Ada County prosecutor said inside the courtroom Thursday afternoon.

_____ is accused of taking nude pictures a 16-year-old girl and 15-year-old boy.

"He told the female to remove her clothing, to remove her shirt so he could take a picture of her holding her breasts."

_____'s Violent Sexual Predator classification stems from child rape and molestation convictions out of Washington in 1994. Now he's facing new allegations of child sexual abuse in Idaho.

"We really force them to look at really personal issues that the average person wouldn't want to talk about," said Sandra McCullough, a licensed counselor with Sane Solutions.

McCullough works with sexual offenders to help get them back on the right track.

When asked if sexual offenders can change and rehabilitation programs do work, McCullough responded by saying: "I think it does, I wouldn't do this work if I didn't believe in it."

McCullough says their program is centered around accountability, looking at the decisions an offender made and focusing on ways to keep them from offending again.

According to a recent report by the Idaho Department of Correction of almost 1,400 men convicted of a sex crime and released from prison, five percent actually re-offended.
- Re-offended how?  I'm assuming they mean another sex crime.

McCullough says that's where focusing on every aspect of an offenders life is crucial.

"If their doing well in their family, they have jobs that pay well, they have no problem with their probation, if they have family support, if all those things are in place the likelihood of them re offending goes down," she said.

McCullough says on average offenders remain in their program for two years, some longer.

Officials with the Idaho Department of Correction say they are getting ready to expand sex offender treatment at the Idaho Correctional Center south of Boise. Officials say this will help offenders start the intense process of treatment inside prison walls and continue the treatment once they are released.




"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)


TX - Could an Old Arrest Cost You Your Career? (You bet it can!)

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Millions of Texans have committed a criminal offense at some point in their lives. The conventional wisdom is that an ex-offender can settle his debt to society by paying a fine, maybe serving a little time, and completing probation or parole. But increasingly, ex-offenders in Texas are finding that their state government continues to treat them like criminals, thwarting their ability to make an honest living and positive contributions to their communities. The Foundation's Center for Effective Justice hosted a Policy Primer on November 7, 2007 that addressed this issue—the audio of which is available in the multimedia section on TexasPolicy.com. The Center has also issued a new report on this issue entitled, 'Working with Conviction: Criminal Offenses as Barriers to Entering Licensed Occupations in Texas,' and its author, Marc Levin, is our guest this week.




"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)


CANADA - Teen lied about sexual assault: RCMP

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She should get the same sentence the accused would have received, IMO.  It's people like this, that make it harder for those who have been sexually abused, to get help.

07/23/2009

A southern Alberta teenager could be charged with public mischief for making a false sexual assault report to police.

RCMP in Strathmore had asked the public for help Monday after a 14-year-old said she had been sexually assaulted by up to five young men around 2 a.m. in an alley behind Strathmore's Co-op liquor store.

Police released a description of three men and a vehicle.

On Thursday, police said the girl had recanted her story. She told officers she made up the story, using details from a verbal encounter she had with two men in the alley.

"The RCMP wish to remind everyone that fictitious claims of criminal offences are not only subject to possible criminal charges, but these stories have a profound effect on the sense of security of the community, negative impact on the reputation of communities, any accused persons and others who are actual victims of crimes," the force said in a release.
- So do something about it, and press charges against this teen!  You got to make an example out of someone!


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)


NJ - US Attorney Says "Corruption was a way of life"

The New Jersey officials and their associates charged in a federal probe of public corruption exchanged hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes in parking lots, restaurants, boiler rooms and bathrooms, an acting U.S. attorney said Thursday.

The investigation netted 44 defendants -- 29 on corruption charges and 15 for alleged money laundering, acting U.S. Attorney Ralph Marra Jr. said at a news conference.

Defendants were to begin appearing Thursday afternoon in U.S. District Court in Newark.