Sunday, September 6, 2009

The Child Molester (1964)

View the article here

And like usual, it doesn't talk about the fact that most sex crimes occur in the victims own home and family. This is just more of the stranger-danger propaganda. Yes, strangers do commit sex crimes, but a vast majority are not strangers.

Produced by the Highway Safety Foundation in 1964, this shocking film deals with a subject quite taboo for its time. The short serves as a dramatized warning, ending with graphic case studies. Unlike the driver's education films produced by the same company, this film was apparently issued for only a short time before being withdrawn.

** WARNING: Crime scene footage at end will upset some people **

This movie is part of the collection: Sci-Fi / Horror

Production Company: Highway Safety Foundation

Video Link



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


FL - Bus stop in front of sex offender's home

View the article here

09/06/2009

By Diane Knich

Dorchester Dist. 2 relocates stop at request of parents

SUMMERVILLE -- For the past two weeks, children in a Summerville neighborhood have been getting on and off their school bus in front of a registered sex offender's house.
- So, this was going on for two weeks, and no child has been harmed.  Kind of kills that high recidivism rate, doesn't it?

A couple with three children -- ages 14, 12 and 9 -- asked officials in Dorchester District 2 to move the bus stop, and district leaders agreed to do it.

Starting Tuesday morning, the stop will be moved to a nearby corner "that's in the best interest of all children in the area," district spokeswoman Pat Raynor said.

Dave Flournoy, who asked that the stop be moved, said he appreciates the district's response. But he doesn't understand why school districts don't check out the places they pick for bus stops more thoroughly.
- Many bus stops have been where they are for many years, and before these insane laws came into being.

Officials from local school districts said they follow state law when establishing bus routes. The law requires them to place stops at least one-fifth of a mile apart. But individual students on a bus route can't be more than one-tenth of a mile from a bus stop if they live directly on the route, or three-tenths of mile if they live on a nearby street. The law also requires districts to consider certain traffic hazards. But it doesn't require them to place bus stops a certain distance from the homes of convicted sex offenders.

A report on school bus service from the state's Department of Education states: "State law places the responsibility for a child's safety on the parent until the school bus arrives at the bus stop in the morning, and after the bus leaves the site in the afternoon."
- And that is where it should be placed, on the parent.  If they are so scared, go to the bus stop with your child and wait for the bus, same for when they are coming home.

Donald Tudor, the department's director of transportation, said it would be difficult to consider sex offenders' residences when selecting bus stops. Such a requirement easily would conflict with the state requirements on the distance between bus stops, he said. And other states that have imposed laws requiring sex offenders to live certain distances from bus stops are having problems enforcing them, he said.

There are many registered sex offenders, Tudor said. If South Carolina required that no bus stop be placed within 1,000 feet of the home of a registered sex offender, "in certain little neighborhoods, it would be impossible to have a bus stop."

For instance, type Flournoy's suburban zip code into the State Law Enforcement Division's registry and you'll get the names of 63 registered sex offenders.

One of them is Flournoy's neighbor, who was convicted of committing a lewd act upon a 15-year-old girl. Flournoy's children's bus stop has been in front of that man's home.

The man said he stays away from the bus stop and doesn't even walk around the neighborhood. "I mind my own business," he said.

South Carolina law prohibits people convicted of the following offenses from living within 1,000 feet of a school, day care center, children's recreational facility, park or public playground:

--Criminal sexual conduct with a minor, first degree.

--Criminal sexual conduct with a minor, second degree.

--Assault with intent to commit criminal sexual conduct with a minor.

--Kidnapping a person younger than 18.

But it doesn't restrict them from living near school bus stops. The law does require school districts to either provide parents and guardians the names and addresses of certain sex offenders who live within 1,000 feet of their children's bus stop or to place the hyperlink to the state's sex offender registry on the district's Web site.

The Berkeley and Charleston school districts and rural Dorchester District 4 have posted the link on their Web sites. But Dorchester District 2 didn't notify parents, school officials said, and the district hasn't placed the link on its Web site.

Tudor said that although school districts aren't required to consider sex offenders residences when placing bus stops, most respond to parents' complaints and move the stops when possible.

Raynor said the bus stop in Flournoy's neighborhood is the second the district moved this year after neighbors complained about its proximity to the home of a sex offender. District representatives in Berkeley and Charleston counties said they also have had complaints and moved such stops.

School districts and lawmakers across the country have faced the issue, said Ron Book, a Florida lobbyist who pushed for tough laws restricting where sex offenders could live. Book, whose teenage daughter was the victim of a sex offender, said he stands behind such laws, even though they have severely limited where convicted offenders can live.
- Of course he does.  He is running on emotion and exploiting sex offenders to get brownie points to make himself look better.  He has admitted that the registry, nor residency restrictions would have prevented the abuse of his daughter, but he thinks exiling offenders is okay.  The person who abused his daughter, was a nanny who had no record and was not on any registry, yet the abuse occurred anyway.  Now, he wants to punish all offenders for this one person who abused his daughter, IMO.

Many jurisdictions in Florida prohibit offenders from living within 2,500 feet of a bus stop. In one southern Florida community, many offenders were reported living under a bridge because their housing options were so sharply limited.

But Book, who is chairman of an organization that serves the homeless, said he doesn't think the law is causing the problem. Probation and parole officers need to work more closely with offenders to help them find housing, he said.
- Of course he says this, he's the one who pushed the legislature to pass the laws, and now that more than 70 offenders are living under a bridge like lepers, forcing him to use stimulus money to find some of them homes for a month, he's scrambling around to protect his and Miami's image.


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


MO - Mandates add to sex offender registry

View the article here

This reporter republished this article, originally from 2008, and the case is in federal court awaiting a verdict, so this is just disinformation, as usual!

09/06/2009

By R.J. Cooper

County trying to retread steps

Ever-shifting legislative and judicial landscapes have required the Buchanan County Sheriff’s Department to retread its steps in registering sex offenders.

In 2006, the Missouri Supreme Court ruled that laws can’t retroactively apply to people. Sex offenders whose crimes came before the state’s Megan’s Law in 1995 didn’t have to register, the court said.

So Buchanan County removed about 130 names from its sex offender registry.

But the federal government mandated that states comply with the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act by July, or face a 10 percent cut in congressional grants for crime fighting. The act requires registering all sex offenders, even prior to 1995.
- The last time I checked, this is bribery. And, I do not think that the AWA mandates that they register everyone. I could be wrong, but check for yourself here. If this were true, then people would not be petitioning the courts to get off the registries and winning, now would they.  Missouri saw money, so they decided to go for the money, but, in the long run, it will cost them more to enforce it, than if they just ignored the AWA and made their own laws and regulations.

So in June, the Missouri Supreme Court reversed its decision, citing the federal mandate. And with that, the Sheriff’s Department, in conjunction with the Missouri State Highway Patrol and the St. Joseph Police Department, set out to locate and register the pre-’95 offenders living in the county.

As of this week, the county had re-registered about 75 people. Most registered on their own after the Highway Patrol sent out letters notifying each offender of the change. The county only had to track down approximately 10, and filed criminal charges against two for not complying.

The Sheriff’s Department has another 30 offenders to identify. Any of those people could’ve moved or died, but the county still has to account for them and notify the county to which they moved.

We were always able to stay busy prior to this,” said Sgt. Shawn Collie, whose department has a clerk and detective devoted entirely to sex offender cases, thanks to grant money. “It’s going to be a very tedious task. But community safety is our first goal, and we will work whatever we have to work to ensure the laws are followed.”

But even with the redundancy of the extra workload, Mr. Collie was in favor of the state Supreme Court’s most recent decision in the matter.

There is no way for us to look at an individual and say this person is going to re-offend and this person is not going to re-offend,” he said. “The safest approach is to go with that approach that we are going to have all sex offenders follow the same guidelines. I think that Supreme Court ruling is definitely a step in the right direction toward keeping our community safe.”
- This is flat out disinformation.  They can hire a review board who reviews all sex offenders, like other states have done, and determine their risk of offending or not, but, like usual, they take the easy way out.

In that vein, Missouri also banned sex offenders from being within 500 feet of a park that has playground equipment or a swimming pool, or of a child care facility when children are present. They also can’t coach or be a trainer of a sports team that has a member who is younger than 17.
- They have banned them from loitering within 500 feet, and if a person is at a park with their own child, then that is not loitering.

That law went into effect last month.

That’s going to be a really difficult task,” Mr. Collie said of enforcement. “Our goal is going to be cooperation with our other departments.”

In addition to working with the Highway Patrol, the school district and Police Department, the Sheriff’s Department also will enlist the help of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department to enforce the new law. Mr. Collie would like compliance to become a community effort, and that starts with raising public awareness to the issue.

When there are events with children at parks,” Mr. Collie said, “you can probably pretty much guarantee that (the Sheriff’s Department) or other departments working with us will probably be looking after the community’s well-being by being there for sex offenders.”


"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved


CNN - Can Sex Offender Be Cured and Sex Offender Rehabilitation

Why do all the news outlets and talk shows always pick Jake Goldenflame as some spokesman for all sex offenders? This man speaks for himself and himself alone. They should be contacting Mary at S.O.S.E.N. if they want someone to talk to, IMO. See this item for more comments.

Video Link


Video Link



"The mood and temper of the public in regard to the treatment of crime and criminals is one of the most unfailing tests of a civilization. We must have a desire to rehabilitate into the world of industry, all those who have paid their dues in the hard coinage of punishment." - Winston Churchill (United States Constitution)

© 2006-2009 Sex Offender Issues , All Rights Reserved